Epidemiologic findings from an outbreak of cysticercosis in feedlot cattle

Darwin R. Yoder From the Frontage Green Animal Clinic, 3060 S 1950 E, Wendell, ID 83355

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Eric D. Ebel USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, 7261 Franklin Rd, Boise, ID 83709

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Dale D. Hancock the Field Disease Investigation Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (Hancock).

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Bret A. Combs USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, 7261 Franklin Rd, Boise, ID 83709

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Summary

An outbreak of cysticercosis in a south-central Idaho custom feedlot reached a peak prevalence of 11% in January 1993 and extended from October 1992 through March 1993. Of 5,164 cattle slaughtered from this feedlot during the outbreak, 457 (9%) were cysticercosis infected. Total discounts on the infected cattle at slaughter cost the feedlot $154,400.

Most evidence was suggestive of feed-borne transmission of Taenia saginata eggs to the cattle in the feedlot. By use of logistic regression analysis of feedlot records, significant (P = 0.004) association of cysticercosis prevalence at slaughter with days on feed was revealed. Similarly, a decline in cysticercosis prevalence was significantly (P < 0.001) related to the number of days cattle were fed a ration not containing potato byproduct. Although sources other than potato byproduct were systematically evaluated during the investigation, findings suggested that potato byproduct fed in this feedlot was contaminated with T saginata eggs.

Summary

An outbreak of cysticercosis in a south-central Idaho custom feedlot reached a peak prevalence of 11% in January 1993 and extended from October 1992 through March 1993. Of 5,164 cattle slaughtered from this feedlot during the outbreak, 457 (9%) were cysticercosis infected. Total discounts on the infected cattle at slaughter cost the feedlot $154,400.

Most evidence was suggestive of feed-borne transmission of Taenia saginata eggs to the cattle in the feedlot. By use of logistic regression analysis of feedlot records, significant (P = 0.004) association of cysticercosis prevalence at slaughter with days on feed was revealed. Similarly, a decline in cysticercosis prevalence was significantly (P < 0.001) related to the number of days cattle were fed a ration not containing potato byproduct. Although sources other than potato byproduct were systematically evaluated during the investigation, findings suggested that potato byproduct fed in this feedlot was contaminated with T saginata eggs.

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