Results of using histologic examination and acid-fast staining to confirm a diagnosis of swine mycobacteriosis made on the basis of gross examination

Marcia J. Margolis From the Departments of Veterinary Science (Margolis, Hutchinson, Hattel) and Dairy and Animal Science (Kephart), The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802-3500; Department of Medicine, New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348-1692 (Whitlock); and Diagnostic Bacteriology Laboratory, National Veterinary Services Laboratory, Ames, IA 50010 (Payeur).

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Lawrence J. Hutchinson From the Departments of Veterinary Science (Margolis, Hutchinson, Hattel) and Dairy and Animal Science (Kephart), The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802-3500; Department of Medicine, New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348-1692 (Whitlock); and Diagnostic Bacteriology Laboratory, National Veterinary Services Laboratory, Ames, IA 50010 (Payeur).

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Kenneth B. Kephart From the Departments of Veterinary Science (Margolis, Hutchinson, Hattel) and Dairy and Animal Science (Kephart), The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802-3500; Department of Medicine, New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348-1692 (Whitlock); and Diagnostic Bacteriology Laboratory, National Veterinary Services Laboratory, Ames, IA 50010 (Payeur).

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Arthur L. Hattel From the Departments of Veterinary Science (Margolis, Hutchinson, Hattel) and Dairy and Animal Science (Kephart), The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802-3500; Department of Medicine, New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348-1692 (Whitlock); and Diagnostic Bacteriology Laboratory, National Veterinary Services Laboratory, Ames, IA 50010 (Payeur).

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Robert H. Whitlock From the Departments of Veterinary Science (Margolis, Hutchinson, Hattel) and Dairy and Animal Science (Kephart), The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802-3500; Department of Medicine, New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348-1692 (Whitlock); and Diagnostic Bacteriology Laboratory, National Veterinary Services Laboratory, Ames, IA 50010 (Payeur).

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Janet B. Payeur From the Departments of Veterinary Science (Margolis, Hutchinson, Hattel) and Dairy and Animal Science (Kephart), The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802-3500; Department of Medicine, New Bolton Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Kennett Square, PA 19348-1692 (Whitlock); and Diagnostic Bacteriology Laboratory, National Veterinary Services Laboratory, Ames, IA 50010 (Payeur).

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Summary

Overall, 74% of the tissue specimens that meat inspectors at a large Pennsylvania packing plant identified as lesions of swine mycobacteriosis yielded Mycobacterium avium on bacteriologie culture. Histopathologic lesions compatible with mycobacteriosis were identified in 83% of the specimens; only 12% of the specimens had acid-fast staining organisms.

Summary

Overall, 74% of the tissue specimens that meat inspectors at a large Pennsylvania packing plant identified as lesions of swine mycobacteriosis yielded Mycobacterium avium on bacteriologie culture. Histopathologic lesions compatible with mycobacteriosis were identified in 83% of the specimens; only 12% of the specimens had acid-fast staining organisms.

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