Effect of management practices on the Streptococcus suis carrier rate in nursery swine

S. A. Dee From the Swine Health Center, 621 Pacific Ave, Morris, MN 56267.

Search for other papers by S. A. Dee in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
A. R. Carlson From the Swine Health Center, 621 Pacific Ave, Morris, MN 56267.

Search for other papers by A. R. Carlson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
N. L. Winkelman From the Swine Health Center, 621 Pacific Ave, Morris, MN 56267.

Search for other papers by N. L. Winkelman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
, and
M. M. Corey From the Swine Health Center, 621 Pacific Ave, Morris, MN 56267.

Search for other papers by M. M. Corey in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

Management practices on swine farms were analyzed to determine factor(s) associated with high prevalence of pigs that were carriers of Streptococcus suis. Samples were obtained for bacteriologic culture via direct swabbing of palatine tonsils of healthy nursery pigs on 35 farms throughout the United States. Overall, 36.7% of the pigs were determined to be carriers. Isolates of S suis were serotyped, and antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed by use of Kirby-Bauer techniques. Streptococcus suis types 1 and 2 were most commonly isolated. All isolates were susceptible to enrofloxacin, 97% of the isolates were susceptible to ceftiofur, and 94% were susceptible to ampicillin. However, only 80% of the isolates were susceptible to penicillin, and only 18% were susceptible to tetracycline.

Environmental, managerial, nutritional, and health factors were measured on each farm. Excessive temperature fluctuation, high relative humidity, crowding, and an age spread of > 2 weeks between pigs in the same room were the 4 most commonly encountered problems on farms with higher-than-average percentages of carrier pigs. Continuous flow facilities were found on 50% of these farms, and various disease problems, vitamin E/selenium deficiency, inadequate vaccination programs (attributable to the presence of atypical serotypes), and penicillin-resistant strains were found on 6 to 28% of these farms. Overall, 83% (15/18) of farms with higher-than-average percentages of carrier pigs also had a history of clinical S suis disease.

Summary

Management practices on swine farms were analyzed to determine factor(s) associated with high prevalence of pigs that were carriers of Streptococcus suis. Samples were obtained for bacteriologic culture via direct swabbing of palatine tonsils of healthy nursery pigs on 35 farms throughout the United States. Overall, 36.7% of the pigs were determined to be carriers. Isolates of S suis were serotyped, and antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed by use of Kirby-Bauer techniques. Streptococcus suis types 1 and 2 were most commonly isolated. All isolates were susceptible to enrofloxacin, 97% of the isolates were susceptible to ceftiofur, and 94% were susceptible to ampicillin. However, only 80% of the isolates were susceptible to penicillin, and only 18% were susceptible to tetracycline.

Environmental, managerial, nutritional, and health factors were measured on each farm. Excessive temperature fluctuation, high relative humidity, crowding, and an age spread of > 2 weeks between pigs in the same room were the 4 most commonly encountered problems on farms with higher-than-average percentages of carrier pigs. Continuous flow facilities were found on 50% of these farms, and various disease problems, vitamin E/selenium deficiency, inadequate vaccination programs (attributable to the presence of atypical serotypes), and penicillin-resistant strains were found on 6 to 28% of these farms. Overall, 83% (15/18) of farms with higher-than-average percentages of carrier pigs also had a history of clinical S suis disease.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 519 519 257
PDF Downloads 33 33 10
Advertisement