Prognosis after surgical excision of cerebral meningiomas in cats: 17 cases (1986–1992)

Jack G. Gallagher From the Departments of Surgery (Gallagher, Berg, Williams), Medicine (Knowles), and Pathology (Bronson), School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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John Berg From the Departments of Surgery (Gallagher, Berg, Williams), Medicine (Knowles), and Pathology (Bronson), School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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Kim E. Knowles From the Departments of Surgery (Gallagher, Berg, Williams), Medicine (Knowles), and Pathology (Bronson), School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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Leslie L. Williams From the Departments of Surgery (Gallagher, Berg, Williams), Medicine (Knowles), and Pathology (Bronson), School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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Roderick T. Bronson From the Departments of Surgery (Gallagher, Berg, Williams), Medicine (Knowles), and Pathology (Bronson), School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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Summary

Long-term follow-up information was obtained for 17 cats with cerebral meningiomas treated by surgical excision. Three cats died or were euthanatized in the immediate postoperative period: 2 cats, because of brain herniation and 1 cat, because of acute renal failure. In the remaining 14 cats, most clinical signs resolved within 1 week of surgery. Three cats (21.4%) had confirmed or presumed local tumor recurrence. Two of these cats developed recurrent neurologic signs, and died or were euthanatized at 3 and 9 months, respectively, after surgery. One cat was euthanatized for an unrelated problem 72 months after surgery, and on postmortem examination, had a recurrent meningioma at the surgery site. The remaining 11 cats (78.6%) did not develop evidence of local tumor recurrence within follow-up periods ranging from 18 to 47 months (median, 27 months).

Summary

Long-term follow-up information was obtained for 17 cats with cerebral meningiomas treated by surgical excision. Three cats died or were euthanatized in the immediate postoperative period: 2 cats, because of brain herniation and 1 cat, because of acute renal failure. In the remaining 14 cats, most clinical signs resolved within 1 week of surgery. Three cats (21.4%) had confirmed or presumed local tumor recurrence. Two of these cats developed recurrent neurologic signs, and died or were euthanatized at 3 and 9 months, respectively, after surgery. One cat was euthanatized for an unrelated problem 72 months after surgery, and on postmortem examination, had a recurrent meningioma at the surgery site. The remaining 11 cats (78.6%) did not develop evidence of local tumor recurrence within follow-up periods ranging from 18 to 47 months (median, 27 months).

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