Photodynamic therapy for nasal and aural squamous cell carcinoma in cats

Anne E. Peaston From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Peaston) and the Department of Pathology (Leach, Higgins), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Michael W. Leach From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Peaston) and the Department of Pathology (Leach, Higgins), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Robert J. Higgins From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Peaston) and the Department of Pathology (Leach, Higgins), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Summary:

Eighteen random-bred cats with a total of 19 nasal or aural squamous cell carcinomas were treated with photodynamic therapy, using aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfhonate as the photosensitizer. Cats were irradiated at power densities of 100 mW/cm2 and energy densities of 100 J/cm2. Successful outcome was obtained in 10 tumors after 1 treatment, and 2 more tumors had complete responses after 1 or 2 additional treatments. Treatments were more effective in tumors of stage T2 or earlier. Five tumors had partial responses, and the response of 2 tumors could not be evaluated. The treatment was safe and well tolerated by most cats, although we found that cats should be kept out of sunlight for 2 weeks after treatment.

Summary:

Eighteen random-bred cats with a total of 19 nasal or aural squamous cell carcinomas were treated with photodynamic therapy, using aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfhonate as the photosensitizer. Cats were irradiated at power densities of 100 mW/cm2 and energy densities of 100 J/cm2. Successful outcome was obtained in 10 tumors after 1 treatment, and 2 more tumors had complete responses after 1 or 2 additional treatments. Treatments were more effective in tumors of stage T2 or earlier. Five tumors had partial responses, and the response of 2 tumors could not be evaluated. The treatment was safe and well tolerated by most cats, although we found that cats should be kept out of sunlight for 2 weeks after treatment.

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