Adverse effects of administration of propofol with various preanesthetic regimens in dogs

J. A. Smith From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.

Search for other papers by J. A. Smith in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
J. S. Gaynor From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.

Search for other papers by J. S. Gaynor in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
R. M. Bednarski From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.

Search for other papers by R. M. Bednarski in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
, and
W. W. Muir From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.

Search for other papers by W. W. Muir in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary:

The effects of propofol on anesthetic induction were evaluated in 40 dogs anesthetized with isoflurane. Propofol is a rapidly acting, nonbarbiturate drug that induces anesthesia of ultrashort duration with iv administration. Four preanesthetic regimens were used: anesthesia without preanesthetic drugs; or with preanesthetic administration of acepromazine (0.1 mg/kg of body weight, im), diazepam (0.2 mg/kg, iv), or acepromazine (0.02 mg/kg) and butorphanol (0.4 mg/kg) im. Heart rate, systolic arterial blood pressure (sap), respiration, quality of induction and recovery, and adverse effects were recorded. Intravenous propofol administration induced a variable period of apnea in 34 of 40 dogs. Cyanosis (in 2 dogs) and signs of pain on injection (in 3 dogs) were infrequently observed during induction. One dog developed ventricular premature depolarizations after propofol administration. Venous CO2 tension increased and pH decreased immediately after propofol administration, regardless of preanesthetic regimen. The sap significantly (P < 0.05) decreased after propofol administration in dogs treated with acepromazine (sap, 178 mm of Hg before vs 128 mm of Hg after propofol) and with acepromazine/butorphanol (sap, 184 mm of Hg before vs 98 mm of Hg after propofol). When used for induction, propofol induces anesthetic-related adverse effects, some of which can be minimized by preanesthetic medication. Recovery characteristics varied with preanesthetic medication, independent of propofol administration.

Summary:

The effects of propofol on anesthetic induction were evaluated in 40 dogs anesthetized with isoflurane. Propofol is a rapidly acting, nonbarbiturate drug that induces anesthesia of ultrashort duration with iv administration. Four preanesthetic regimens were used: anesthesia without preanesthetic drugs; or with preanesthetic administration of acepromazine (0.1 mg/kg of body weight, im), diazepam (0.2 mg/kg, iv), or acepromazine (0.02 mg/kg) and butorphanol (0.4 mg/kg) im. Heart rate, systolic arterial blood pressure (sap), respiration, quality of induction and recovery, and adverse effects were recorded. Intravenous propofol administration induced a variable period of apnea in 34 of 40 dogs. Cyanosis (in 2 dogs) and signs of pain on injection (in 3 dogs) were infrequently observed during induction. One dog developed ventricular premature depolarizations after propofol administration. Venous CO2 tension increased and pH decreased immediately after propofol administration, regardless of preanesthetic regimen. The sap significantly (P < 0.05) decreased after propofol administration in dogs treated with acepromazine (sap, 178 mm of Hg before vs 128 mm of Hg after propofol) and with acepromazine/butorphanol (sap, 184 mm of Hg before vs 98 mm of Hg after propofol). When used for induction, propofol induces anesthetic-related adverse effects, some of which can be minimized by preanesthetic medication. Recovery characteristics varied with preanesthetic medication, independent of propofol administration.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 287 287 104
PDF Downloads 136 136 32
Advertisement