Effects of oral administration of a calcium-containing gel on serum calcium concentration in postparturient dairy cows

W. Gregory Queen From the Departments of Veterinary Preventive Medicine (Queen, Miller), and Field Service (Masterson), College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Gay Y. Miller From the Departments of Veterinary Preventive Medicine (Queen, Miller), and Field Service (Masterson), College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Margaret A. Masterson From the Departments of Veterinary Preventive Medicine (Queen, Miller), and Field Service (Masterson), College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Summary:

Various nutrious nutritional-supplement gels are being marketed for use in veterinary medicine. This study was designed to determine whether serum calcium, phosphorous, or magnesium concentrations were different between cows given a gel containing calcium chloride as its active ingredient (treated) and cows given inert carrier gel (control). The study revealed a significant (P < 0.01) increase in serum total calcium concentration within 5 minutes of administration of a calcium gel given to cows within 1 hour of parturition. Serum total calcium concentration had returned to baseline value by 24 hours after calcium gel administration. Serum inorganic phosphorus concentration also increased significantly (P < 0.05) after treatment. Significant changes in serum magnesium concentrations were not detected.

Summary:

Various nutrious nutritional-supplement gels are being marketed for use in veterinary medicine. This study was designed to determine whether serum calcium, phosphorous, or magnesium concentrations were different between cows given a gel containing calcium chloride as its active ingredient (treated) and cows given inert carrier gel (control). The study revealed a significant (P < 0.01) increase in serum total calcium concentration within 5 minutes of administration of a calcium gel given to cows within 1 hour of parturition. Serum total calcium concentration had returned to baseline value by 24 hours after calcium gel administration. Serum inorganic phosphorus concentration also increased significantly (P < 0.05) after treatment. Significant changes in serum magnesium concentrations were not detected.

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