Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii-specific antibodies and antigens in the aqueous humor of cats

Michael R. Lappin From the Department of Clinical Sciences (Lappin, Roberts, Powell) and Environmental Health (Reif) College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, and the Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine (Davidson), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

Search for other papers by Michael R. Lappin in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Steven M. Roberts From the Department of Clinical Sciences (Lappin, Roberts, Powell) and Environmental Health (Reif) College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, and the Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine (Davidson), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

Search for other papers by Steven M. Roberts in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Michael G. Davidson From the Department of Clinical Sciences (Lappin, Roberts, Powell) and Environmental Health (Reif) College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, and the Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine (Davidson), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

Search for other papers by Michael G. Davidson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Cynthia C. Powell From the Department of Clinical Sciences (Lappin, Roberts, Powell) and Environmental Health (Reif) College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, and the Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine (Davidson), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

Search for other papers by Cynthia C. Powell in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
, and
John S. Reif From the Department of Clinical Sciences (Lappin, Roberts, Powell) and Environmental Health (Reif) College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, and the Department of Companion Animal and Special Species Medicine (Davidson), College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

Search for other papers by John S. Reif in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

Serum and aqueous humor samples, collected from 14 clinically normal cats and 96 cats with clinical evidence of intraocular inflammation, were assayed with elisa for Toxoplasma gondii-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM), T gondii-specific IgG, T gondii-specific antigens, total IgG, and total IgM. Additionally, serum was assayed with elisa for feline leukemia virus p27 antigen and antibodies against the feline immunodeficiency virus as well as with an immunofluorescent antibody assay for antibodies against feline coronaviruses. Calculation of the Goldmann-Witmer coefficient (C-value) for the T gondii-specific antibodies detected in aqueous humor established the likelihood of local antibody production. Serologic evidence of present or prior infection by an infectious agent was found in 81.9% of the clinically affected cats from which serologic results were available (77/94 cats). Seropositive results for toxoplasmosis were found in 74.0% of the clinically affected cats. Anterior segment inflammation was found in 93.1% (81/87 cats from which information was available) of the clinically affected cats, most of which were older males. Toxoplasma gondii-specific antibodies were not detected in the aqueous humor of 6 seropositive, clinically normal cats. The C-values for aqueous T gondii antibodies were > 1 in 44.8% of the cats and > 8 in 24.0% of the cats. Response to treatment with clin-damycn HCl was positive in 15/20 (75%) of the T gondii-seroposidve, clinically affected cats treated with this drug. In 13/15 (86.7%) T gondii-seropositive, clinically affected cats having a C-value > 1, response to treatment with clindamycin HCl was positive. On the basis of our findings, we concluded that serologic evidence of exposure to infectious agents is common in cats with uveitis, toxoplasmosis may be a common cause of uveitis in cats, use of the Goldmann-Witmer coefficient may aid in the diagnosis of ocular toxoplasmosis in cats, and use of clindamycin HCl may be beneficial in the treatment of ocular toxoplasmosis in cats.

Summary

Serum and aqueous humor samples, collected from 14 clinically normal cats and 96 cats with clinical evidence of intraocular inflammation, were assayed with elisa for Toxoplasma gondii-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM), T gondii-specific IgG, T gondii-specific antigens, total IgG, and total IgM. Additionally, serum was assayed with elisa for feline leukemia virus p27 antigen and antibodies against the feline immunodeficiency virus as well as with an immunofluorescent antibody assay for antibodies against feline coronaviruses. Calculation of the Goldmann-Witmer coefficient (C-value) for the T gondii-specific antibodies detected in aqueous humor established the likelihood of local antibody production. Serologic evidence of present or prior infection by an infectious agent was found in 81.9% of the clinically affected cats from which serologic results were available (77/94 cats). Seropositive results for toxoplasmosis were found in 74.0% of the clinically affected cats. Anterior segment inflammation was found in 93.1% (81/87 cats from which information was available) of the clinically affected cats, most of which were older males. Toxoplasma gondii-specific antibodies were not detected in the aqueous humor of 6 seropositive, clinically normal cats. The C-values for aqueous T gondii antibodies were > 1 in 44.8% of the cats and > 8 in 24.0% of the cats. Response to treatment with clin-damycn HCl was positive in 15/20 (75%) of the T gondii-seroposidve, clinically affected cats treated with this drug. In 13/15 (86.7%) T gondii-seropositive, clinically affected cats having a C-value > 1, response to treatment with clindamycin HCl was positive. On the basis of our findings, we concluded that serologic evidence of exposure to infectious agents is common in cats with uveitis, toxoplasmosis may be a common cause of uveitis in cats, use of the Goldmann-Witmer coefficient may aid in the diagnosis of ocular toxoplasmosis in cats, and use of clindamycin HCl may be beneficial in the treatment of ocular toxoplasmosis in cats.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 650 650 173
PDF Downloads 57 57 10
Advertisement