Serologic prevalence of selected infectious diseases in cats with uveitis

Michael R. Lappin From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Lappin, Powell) and Environmental Health (Reif), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, the Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, the University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Marks, Greene), and the Diagnostic Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Collins, Carman).

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Amanda Marks From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Lappin, Powell) and Environmental Health (Reif), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, the Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, the University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Marks, Greene), and the Diagnostic Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Collins, Carman).

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Craig E. Greene From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Lappin, Powell) and Environmental Health (Reif), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, the Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, the University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Marks, Greene), and the Diagnostic Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Collins, Carman).

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James K. Collins From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Lappin, Powell) and Environmental Health (Reif), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, the Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, the University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Marks, Greene), and the Diagnostic Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Collins, Carman).

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Jane Carman From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Lappin, Powell) and Environmental Health (Reif), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, the Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, the University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Marks, Greene), and the Diagnostic Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Collins, Carman).

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John S. Reif From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Lappin, Powell) and Environmental Health (Reif), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, the Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, the University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Marks, Greene), and the Diagnostic Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Collins, Carman).

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Cynthia C. Powell From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Lappin, Powell) and Environmental Health (Reif), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, the Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, the University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Marks, Greene), and the Diagnostic Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Collins, Carman).

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Summary

Serologic evidence of infection by Toxoplasma gondii, feline leukemia virus, feline coronaviruses, or feline immunodeficiency virus (fiv) is commonly found in cats with uveitis. Serum samples from 124 cats with uveitis were assayed by use of elisa for the detection of T gondii-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgG, and circulating antigens (Ag), as well as an elisa for feline leukemia virus Ag, an elisa for antibodies to fiv, and an indirect fluorescent antibody assay for antibodies to feline coronaviruses. Serologic evidence of infection by 1 or more of the infectious agents was detected in 83.1% of the samples. Serologic evidence of T gondii infection, defined as the detection of T gondii-specific IgM, IgG, or Ag in serum, was found in 74.2% of the samples. The seroprevalence of T gondii infection was significantly greater in cats with uveitis than in healthy cats from a similar geographic area. Serum samples from cats with serologic evidence of both T gondii and fiv infections were more likely to contain T gondii-specific IgM without IgG than samples from cats with serologic evidence of T gondii infection alone. Cats with serologic evidence of fiv and T gondii coinfection had a higher T gondii-specific IgM titer geometric mean and a lower T gondii-specific IgG titer geometric mean than did cats with serologic evidence of T gondii infection alone. Serologic evaluation for T gondii infection should include assays that detect IgM, IgG, and Ag, particularly in cats coinfected with fiv.

Summary

Serologic evidence of infection by Toxoplasma gondii, feline leukemia virus, feline coronaviruses, or feline immunodeficiency virus (fiv) is commonly found in cats with uveitis. Serum samples from 124 cats with uveitis were assayed by use of elisa for the detection of T gondii-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgG, and circulating antigens (Ag), as well as an elisa for feline leukemia virus Ag, an elisa for antibodies to fiv, and an indirect fluorescent antibody assay for antibodies to feline coronaviruses. Serologic evidence of infection by 1 or more of the infectious agents was detected in 83.1% of the samples. Serologic evidence of T gondii infection, defined as the detection of T gondii-specific IgM, IgG, or Ag in serum, was found in 74.2% of the samples. The seroprevalence of T gondii infection was significantly greater in cats with uveitis than in healthy cats from a similar geographic area. Serum samples from cats with serologic evidence of both T gondii and fiv infections were more likely to contain T gondii-specific IgM without IgG than samples from cats with serologic evidence of T gondii infection alone. Cats with serologic evidence of fiv and T gondii coinfection had a higher T gondii-specific IgM titer geometric mean and a lower T gondii-specific IgG titer geometric mean than did cats with serologic evidence of T gondii infection alone. Serologic evaluation for T gondii infection should include assays that detect IgM, IgG, and Ag, particularly in cats coinfected with fiv.

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