Orbital neoplasms in cats: 21 cases (1974-1990)

Brian C. Gilger From the Departments of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Gilger, McLaughlin, Whitley) and Pathobiology (Wright), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849- 5523.

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Susan A. McLaughlin From the Departments of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Gilger, McLaughlin, Whitley) and Pathobiology (Wright), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849- 5523.

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R. David Whitley From the Departments of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Gilger, McLaughlin, Whitley) and Pathobiology (Wright), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849- 5523.

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James C. Wright From the Departments of Small Animal Surgery and Medicine (Gilger, McLaughlin, Whitley) and Pathobiology (Wright), College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849- 5523.

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Summary

Squamous cell carcinoma was the most common neoplasm found in a review of case records of 21 cats with histopathologically confirmed orbital neoplasms. Other neoplasms found were lymphosarcoma, undifferentiated carcinoma, malignant melanoma, adenocarcinoma, fibrosarcoma, chondroma, and hemangiosarcoma. Three (14%) neoplasms were primary, 15 (71%) were secondary, invading the orbit from adjacent tissues, and 3 (14%) were a manifestation of multicentric disease. The most common clinical sign was exophthalmia, followed by chronic epiphora, enophthalmia, and strabismus. Mean survival time after diagnosis was 1.9 months. Ten cats were euthanatized at the time of diagnosis because of extensive disease. Mean survival time of the other 11 cats was 4.3 months. Skull radiography was helpful in diagnosing orbital neoplasms in 8 of 11 cats that had invasion of the orbit by adjacent neoplasms.

Summary

Squamous cell carcinoma was the most common neoplasm found in a review of case records of 21 cats with histopathologically confirmed orbital neoplasms. Other neoplasms found were lymphosarcoma, undifferentiated carcinoma, malignant melanoma, adenocarcinoma, fibrosarcoma, chondroma, and hemangiosarcoma. Three (14%) neoplasms were primary, 15 (71%) were secondary, invading the orbit from adjacent tissues, and 3 (14%) were a manifestation of multicentric disease. The most common clinical sign was exophthalmia, followed by chronic epiphora, enophthalmia, and strabismus. Mean survival time after diagnosis was 1.9 months. Ten cats were euthanatized at the time of diagnosis because of extensive disease. Mean survival time of the other 11 cats was 4.3 months. Skull radiography was helpful in diagnosing orbital neoplasms in 8 of 11 cats that had invasion of the orbit by adjacent neoplasms.

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