Leiomyosarcoma in dogs: 44 cases (1983-1988)

Amy S. Kapatkin From the Departments of Surgery (Kapatkin, Mullen, Matthiesen) and Pathology (Patnaik), The Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10021.

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Holly S. Mullen From the Departments of Surgery (Kapatkin, Mullen, Matthiesen) and Pathology (Patnaik), The Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10021.

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David T. Matthiesen From the Departments of Surgery (Kapatkin, Mullen, Matthiesen) and Pathology (Patnaik), The Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10021.

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Amiya K. Patnaik From the Departments of Surgery (Kapatkin, Mullen, Matthiesen) and Pathology (Patnaik), The Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10021.

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Summary

During a 5-year period, leiomyosarcoma was diagnosed in 57 dogs. Forty-four dogs were included in the study on the basis of completeness of medical records. All dogs underwent exploratory laparotomy, and dogs were allotted to 4 groups according to primary site of tumor: spleen (16 dogs, median age 10.3 years), stomach/small intestine (13 dogs, median age 10.3 years), cecum (10 dogs, median age 11.8 years), and liver (5 dogs, median age 9 years). All dogs with leiomyosarcoma of the liver had visible metastasis and were euthanatized at surgery. In the other 3 groups, 79% of the dogs had no gross evidence of metastasis at surgery, and 64% survived > 2 weeks. Median survival in these 3 groups was 10 months (range, 1 month to 7 years); 48% died of metastasis, 32% died of unrelated causes, and 16% died of unknown causes. The prognosis in dogs with leiomyosarcoma of the spleen, stomach, small intestine, and especially the cecum is good to excellent if surgery is performed. In dogs with leiomyosarcoma of the liver, the prognosis is poor.

Summary

During a 5-year period, leiomyosarcoma was diagnosed in 57 dogs. Forty-four dogs were included in the study on the basis of completeness of medical records. All dogs underwent exploratory laparotomy, and dogs were allotted to 4 groups according to primary site of tumor: spleen (16 dogs, median age 10.3 years), stomach/small intestine (13 dogs, median age 10.3 years), cecum (10 dogs, median age 11.8 years), and liver (5 dogs, median age 9 years). All dogs with leiomyosarcoma of the liver had visible metastasis and were euthanatized at surgery. In the other 3 groups, 79% of the dogs had no gross evidence of metastasis at surgery, and 64% survived > 2 weeks. Median survival in these 3 groups was 10 months (range, 1 month to 7 years); 48% died of metastasis, 32% died of unrelated causes, and 16% died of unknown causes. The prognosis in dogs with leiomyosarcoma of the spleen, stomach, small intestine, and especially the cecum is good to excellent if surgery is performed. In dogs with leiomyosarcoma of the liver, the prognosis is poor.

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