Hypoplasia of the trachea in dogs: 103 cases (1974-1990)

Bonnie E. Coyne From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-5606 (Coyne, Fingland).

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 DVM, MS
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Roger B. Fingland From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506-5606 (Coyne, Fingland).

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Summary

A multi-institutional retrospective study of 103 dogs in which hypoplasia of the trachea was diagnosed was conducted. Bulldogs (55%) and Boston Terriers (15%) were most commonly affected. Age at diagnosis ranged from 2 days to 12 years, with a median of 5 months. Hypoplasia of the trachea was diagnosed more frequently in males (66%) than females (34%). Congenital anomalies in dogs with hypoplasia of the trachea included elongated soft palate (n = 44), stenotic nares (n = 23), cardiac defects (n = 12), and megaesophagus (n = 10). Ratios between tracheal lumen diameter and depth of the thoracic inlet or width of the third rib did not correlate with dyspnea. Of 42 dogs reexamined >6 months after diagnosis, 25 (60%) were clinically normal. The remaining 17 were dyspneic and 15 (88%) had concurrent respiratory or cardiovascular disease that could account for their clinical signs. Hypoplasia of the trachea appears to be tolerated well in the absence of concurrent respiratory or cardiovascular disease.

Summary

A multi-institutional retrospective study of 103 dogs in which hypoplasia of the trachea was diagnosed was conducted. Bulldogs (55%) and Boston Terriers (15%) were most commonly affected. Age at diagnosis ranged from 2 days to 12 years, with a median of 5 months. Hypoplasia of the trachea was diagnosed more frequently in males (66%) than females (34%). Congenital anomalies in dogs with hypoplasia of the trachea included elongated soft palate (n = 44), stenotic nares (n = 23), cardiac defects (n = 12), and megaesophagus (n = 10). Ratios between tracheal lumen diameter and depth of the thoracic inlet or width of the third rib did not correlate with dyspnea. Of 42 dogs reexamined >6 months after diagnosis, 25 (60%) were clinically normal. The remaining 17 were dyspneic and 15 (88%) had concurrent respiratory or cardiovascular disease that could account for their clinical signs. Hypoplasia of the trachea appears to be tolerated well in the absence of concurrent respiratory or cardiovascular disease.

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