Examination of Koch's postulates for Borrelia burgdorferi as the causative agent of limb/joint dysfunction in dogs with borreliosis

Terri L. Wasmoen From the Fort Dodge Laboratories, 800 Fifth St NW, Fort Dodge, IA 50501.

Search for other papers by Terri L. Wasmoen in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
Randal W. Sebring From the Fort Dodge Laboratories, 800 Fifth St NW, Fort Dodge, IA 50501.

Search for other papers by Randal W. Sebring in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Barbara M. Blumer From the Fort Dodge Laboratories, 800 Fifth St NW, Fort Dodge, IA 50501.

Search for other papers by Barbara M. Blumer in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BS
,
Lloyd G. Chavez Jr. From the Fort Dodge Laboratories, 800 Fifth St NW, Fort Dodge, IA 50501.

Search for other papers by Lloyd G. Chavez Jr. in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
Hsien-Jue Chu From the Fort Dodge Laboratories, 800 Fifth St NW, Fort Dodge, IA 50501.

Search for other papers by Hsien-Jue Chu in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
, and
William M. Acree From the Fort Dodge Laboratories, 800 Fifth St NW, Fort Dodge, IA 50501.

Search for other papers by William M. Acree in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BS

Summary

Borrelia burgdorferi has been implicated as the causative agent of borreliosis in dogs, which is characteristically a limb/joint disorder, but can be associated with multiple-organ dysfunction. Attempts to reproduce this disease by inoculating dogs with B burgdorferi have not been successful. In the study of this report, B burgdorferi from Ixodes dammini ticks was used to induce signs of limb/joint dysfunction, fever, anorexia, depression, and systemic infection in dogs. A pure culture of this bacterium from the blood of an infected dog has been used to fulfill Koch's postulates for B burgdorferi as the causative agent of limb/joint dysfunction associated with borreliosis in dogs.

Summary

Borrelia burgdorferi has been implicated as the causative agent of borreliosis in dogs, which is characteristically a limb/joint disorder, but can be associated with multiple-organ dysfunction. Attempts to reproduce this disease by inoculating dogs with B burgdorferi have not been successful. In the study of this report, B burgdorferi from Ixodes dammini ticks was used to induce signs of limb/joint dysfunction, fever, anorexia, depression, and systemic infection in dogs. A pure culture of this bacterium from the blood of an infected dog has been used to fulfill Koch's postulates for B burgdorferi as the causative agent of limb/joint dysfunction associated with borreliosis in dogs.

Advertisement