Renal transplantation for treatment of end-stage renal failure in cats

C. R. Gregory From the Department of Surgery (Gregory, Gourley), and Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Kochin), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, and North Valley Veterinary Surgical Services (Broaddus), 1137 D Hartenil Ave, Reading, CA 96002.

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I. M. Gourley From the Department of Surgery (Gregory, Gourley), and Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Kochin), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, and North Valley Veterinary Surgical Services (Broaddus), 1137 D Hartenil Ave, Reading, CA 96002.

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E. J. Kochin From the Department of Surgery (Gregory, Gourley), and Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Kochin), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, and North Valley Veterinary Surgical Services (Broaddus), 1137 D Hartenil Ave, Reading, CA 96002.

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T. W. Broaddus From the Department of Surgery (Gregory, Gourley), and Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Kochin), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, and North Valley Veterinary Surgical Services (Broaddus), 1137 D Hartenil Ave, Reading, CA 96002.

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Summary

Renal transplantation was performed as treatment of end-stage renal failure in 23 cats. Twenty-two cats had chronic renal disease and 1 cat had acute renal disease associated with ethylene glycol-induced toxicosis. Sixteen cats were discharged from the hospital. Nine survived a mean of 8.4 ± 6.5 months, and 7 cats continue to survive at the time of this report (mean 12.6 months). Seven cats died within 2 weeks of surgery. All renal allografts were obtained from unrelated blood-crossmatch-compatible donors. No deaths were attributable to acute renal allograft rejection, demonstrating the successful maintenance of renal allografts by use of cyclosporine and prednisolone immunosuppression in cats.

Summary

Renal transplantation was performed as treatment of end-stage renal failure in 23 cats. Twenty-two cats had chronic renal disease and 1 cat had acute renal disease associated with ethylene glycol-induced toxicosis. Sixteen cats were discharged from the hospital. Nine survived a mean of 8.4 ± 6.5 months, and 7 cats continue to survive at the time of this report (mean 12.6 months). Seven cats died within 2 weeks of surgery. All renal allografts were obtained from unrelated blood-crossmatch-compatible donors. No deaths were attributable to acute renal allograft rejection, demonstrating the successful maintenance of renal allografts by use of cyclosporine and prednisolone immunosuppression in cats.

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