Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in food animal practice

Michelle Kopcha From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Science (Kopcha, Shea) and the Population Medicine Center (Kaneene, Miller), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314, and USDA/APHIS, Risk Analysis Systems, Hyattsville, MD 20782-2058 (Ahl).

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John B. Kaneene From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Science (Kopcha, Shea) and the Population Medicine Center (Kaneene, Miller), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314, and USDA/APHIS, Risk Analysis Systems, Hyattsville, MD 20782-2058 (Ahl).

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Mary Ellen Shea From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Science (Kopcha, Shea) and the Population Medicine Center (Kaneene, Miller), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314, and USDA/APHIS, Risk Analysis Systems, Hyattsville, MD 20782-2058 (Ahl).

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RoseAnn Miller From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Science (Kopcha, Shea) and the Population Medicine Center (Kaneene, Miller), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314, and USDA/APHIS, Risk Analysis Systems, Hyattsville, MD 20782-2058 (Ahl).

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Alwynelle S. Ahl From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Science (Kopcha, Shea) and the Population Medicine Center (Kaneene, Miller), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314, and USDA/APHIS, Risk Analysis Systems, Hyattsville, MD 20782-2058 (Ahl).

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Summary

We attempted to determine the extent to which nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) are used in the treatment of food animals, and whether withdrawal times for milk and slaughter are recommended to clients. A survey questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 2,000 veterinarians whose practices were at least half food animals. A cross-sectional study was used to examine the responses to determine whether differences existed on the basis of a respondent's geographic location, number of years since graduation from veterinary college, and percentage of practice devoted to beef and dairy cattle.

The response rate was 71% (1,424/2,000). Of those practitioners responding, 93% (1,325/1,424) reported using NSAID, with approximately 57 (751/1,322), 24 (327/1,322), and 18% (244/1,322) of respondents reporting use more than once a week, once a week, and 1 to 2 times per month, respectively. Dairy practitioners reported more frequent use than did beef practitioners. Use of flunixin meglumine was reported more frequently than the use of aspirin, phenylbutazone, or dipyrone. Approximately 88% (1,146/1,306) of respondents that used NSAID did so in combination with antibiotics. Withdrawal times for milk and meat were made on the basis of guidelines for the antibiotic. When using NSAID alone, recommendations for withdrawal times for milk and meat varied extensively. Overall, practitioners indicated that NSAID were useful and necessary for the treatment of food-producing animals.

Summary

We attempted to determine the extent to which nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) are used in the treatment of food animals, and whether withdrawal times for milk and slaughter are recommended to clients. A survey questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 2,000 veterinarians whose practices were at least half food animals. A cross-sectional study was used to examine the responses to determine whether differences existed on the basis of a respondent's geographic location, number of years since graduation from veterinary college, and percentage of practice devoted to beef and dairy cattle.

The response rate was 71% (1,424/2,000). Of those practitioners responding, 93% (1,325/1,424) reported using NSAID, with approximately 57 (751/1,322), 24 (327/1,322), and 18% (244/1,322) of respondents reporting use more than once a week, once a week, and 1 to 2 times per month, respectively. Dairy practitioners reported more frequent use than did beef practitioners. Use of flunixin meglumine was reported more frequently than the use of aspirin, phenylbutazone, or dipyrone. Approximately 88% (1,146/1,306) of respondents that used NSAID did so in combination with antibiotics. Withdrawal times for milk and meat were made on the basis of guidelines for the antibiotic. When using NSAID alone, recommendations for withdrawal times for milk and meat varied extensively. Overall, practitioners indicated that NSAID were useful and necessary for the treatment of food-producing animals.

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