Clinical and histologic evaluation of the prolapsed third eyelid gland in dogs

Steven J. Dugan From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Dugan, Severin, Roberts) and the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Medicine (Dugan, Hungerford) and Veterinary Pathobiology (Whiteley), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801.

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Glenn A. Severin From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Dugan, Severin, Roberts) and the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Medicine (Dugan, Hungerford) and Veterinary Pathobiology (Whiteley), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801.

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Laura L. Hungerford From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Dugan, Severin, Roberts) and the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Medicine (Dugan, Hungerford) and Veterinary Pathobiology (Whiteley), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801.

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Herbert E. Whiteley From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Dugan, Severin, Roberts) and the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Medicine (Dugan, Hungerford) and Veterinary Pathobiology (Whiteley), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801.

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Steven M. Roberts From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Dugan, Severin, Roberts) and the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Medicine (Dugan, Hungerford) and Veterinary Pathobiology (Whiteley), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801.

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Summary

Eighteen prolapses of the gland of the third eyelid in 17 Beagles were randomly allocated to 3 groups, which included nontreated (group 1, n = 6), excised (group 2, n = 4), and surgically repositioned (group 3, n = 8) glands. A Schirmer tear test (STT) was performed on affected and normal (control) eyes for 5 consecutive days on weeks 0 (baseline), 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 18, 20, and 24. All prolapsed third eyelid glands were excised and examined histologically.

Ten female and 7 male Beagles were used in the prospective study. Mean age at prolapse was 35.1 weeks (range, 6 to 89 weeks). Control STT data revealed a population mean of 22.2 ± 2.1 mm/min. Complications developed in 4 of 6 eyes when the gland was allowed to remain in a prolapsed position. Complications for group-1 eyes were significantly (P < 0.005) greater than those for eyes in groups 2 and 3 (0 of 12). Comparison of affected and control eye baseline data revealed decreased STT values for eyes with prolapsed glands (P < 0.01). Mean differences between affected and control eyes were 2.2, 2.0, and 3.4 mm/min for groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. A significant (P < 0.001) decrease in lacrimation (0.2 to 3.1 mm/min) in group-2 eyes was detected after removal of the gland. Tear production for affected eyes of nontreated dogs fluctuated above and below that of control eyes prior to excision of the prolapsed gland of the third eyelid; however, with time, affected and control eye STT values were not significantly different. Despite an increase in lacrimation after treatment of group-3 eyes, comparison of affected and control eye STT values revealed a persistent decrease in lacrimation (0 to 2.2 mm/min); however, reduction of lacrimation after surgical repositioning was less than that which resulted if the prolapsed gland of the third eyelid was excised (P < 0.02). Histologic changes in the gland of the third eyelid were mild, and significant differences were not detected among the 3 groups.

Summary

Eighteen prolapses of the gland of the third eyelid in 17 Beagles were randomly allocated to 3 groups, which included nontreated (group 1, n = 6), excised (group 2, n = 4), and surgically repositioned (group 3, n = 8) glands. A Schirmer tear test (STT) was performed on affected and normal (control) eyes for 5 consecutive days on weeks 0 (baseline), 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 18, 20, and 24. All prolapsed third eyelid glands were excised and examined histologically.

Ten female and 7 male Beagles were used in the prospective study. Mean age at prolapse was 35.1 weeks (range, 6 to 89 weeks). Control STT data revealed a population mean of 22.2 ± 2.1 mm/min. Complications developed in 4 of 6 eyes when the gland was allowed to remain in a prolapsed position. Complications for group-1 eyes were significantly (P < 0.005) greater than those for eyes in groups 2 and 3 (0 of 12). Comparison of affected and control eye baseline data revealed decreased STT values for eyes with prolapsed glands (P < 0.01). Mean differences between affected and control eyes were 2.2, 2.0, and 3.4 mm/min for groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. A significant (P < 0.001) decrease in lacrimation (0.2 to 3.1 mm/min) in group-2 eyes was detected after removal of the gland. Tear production for affected eyes of nontreated dogs fluctuated above and below that of control eyes prior to excision of the prolapsed gland of the third eyelid; however, with time, affected and control eye STT values were not significantly different. Despite an increase in lacrimation after treatment of group-3 eyes, comparison of affected and control eye STT values revealed a persistent decrease in lacrimation (0 to 2.2 mm/min); however, reduction of lacrimation after surgical repositioning was less than that which resulted if the prolapsed gland of the third eyelid was excised (P < 0.02). Histologic changes in the gland of the third eyelid were mild, and significant differences were not detected among the 3 groups.

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