Rabies surveillance in the United States during 1991

John W. Krebs From the Viral and Rickettsial Zoonoses Branch (Krebs, Childs) and Biometrics Activity (Holman, Strine, Mandel), Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333. Ms. Hines of Project IMHOTEP is a senior at Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA 30314.

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Robert C. Holman From the Viral and Rickettsial Zoonoses Branch (Krebs, Childs) and Biometrics Activity (Holman, Strine, Mandel), Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333. Ms. Hines of Project IMHOTEP is a senior at Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA 30314.

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Urhonda Hines From the Viral and Rickettsial Zoonoses Branch (Krebs, Childs) and Biometrics Activity (Holman, Strine, Mandel), Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333. Ms. Hines of Project IMHOTEP is a senior at Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA 30314.

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Tara W. Strine From the Viral and Rickettsial Zoonoses Branch (Krebs, Childs) and Biometrics Activity (Holman, Strine, Mandel), Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333. Ms. Hines of Project IMHOTEP is a senior at Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA 30314.

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Eric J. Mandel From the Viral and Rickettsial Zoonoses Branch (Krebs, Childs) and Biometrics Activity (Holman, Strine, Mandel), Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333. Ms. Hines of Project IMHOTEP is a senior at Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA 30314.

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James E. Childs From the Viral and Rickettsial Zoonoses Branch (Krebs, Childs) and Biometrics Activity (Holman, Strine, Mandel), Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333. Ms. Hines of Project IMHOTEP is a senior at Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA 30314.

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Summary

In 1991, 49 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico reported 6,972 cases of rabies in nonhuman animals and 3 cases in human beings to the Centers for Disease Control. Ninety-one percent (6,354 cases) were wild animals, whereas 8.9% (618 cases) were domestic species. The total number of reported cases of rabies increased 42.9% over that of 1990 (4,881 cases), with most of the increase resulting from continued spread of the epizootic of rabies in raccoons in the mid-Atlantic and northeastern states. Large increases in cases of rabies in animals were reported from Connecticut (200 cases in 1991, compared with 3 in 1990, an increase of 6,567%), Delaware (197 cases in 1991, compared with 44 in 1990, an increase of 348%), New York (1,030 cases in 1991, compared with 242 in 1990, an increase of 326%), and New Jersey (994 cases in 1991, compared with 469 in 1990, an increase of 112%). Other noteworthy increases were reported by Wyoming (96.4%), Texas (69.7%), California (41.3%), Oklahoma (33.1%), Minnesota (31.4%), Georgia (26.7%), and Maryland (23.7%). Hawaii reported 1 imported case of rabies in a bat. Only 16 states reported decreases in rabies in animals in 1991, compared with 30 in 1990. Pennsylvania and Iowa reported decreases of 40.6% and 27.4%, respectively. Rhode Island was the only state that did not report a case of rabies in 1991.

Summary

In 1991, 49 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico reported 6,972 cases of rabies in nonhuman animals and 3 cases in human beings to the Centers for Disease Control. Ninety-one percent (6,354 cases) were wild animals, whereas 8.9% (618 cases) were domestic species. The total number of reported cases of rabies increased 42.9% over that of 1990 (4,881 cases), with most of the increase resulting from continued spread of the epizootic of rabies in raccoons in the mid-Atlantic and northeastern states. Large increases in cases of rabies in animals were reported from Connecticut (200 cases in 1991, compared with 3 in 1990, an increase of 6,567%), Delaware (197 cases in 1991, compared with 44 in 1990, an increase of 348%), New York (1,030 cases in 1991, compared with 242 in 1990, an increase of 326%), and New Jersey (994 cases in 1991, compared with 469 in 1990, an increase of 112%). Other noteworthy increases were reported by Wyoming (96.4%), Texas (69.7%), California (41.3%), Oklahoma (33.1%), Minnesota (31.4%), Georgia (26.7%), and Maryland (23.7%). Hawaii reported 1 imported case of rabies in a bat. Only 16 states reported decreases in rabies in animals in 1991, compared with 30 in 1990. Pennsylvania and Iowa reported decreases of 40.6% and 27.4%, respectively. Rhode Island was the only state that did not report a case of rabies in 1991.

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