Traumatic luxation of the cubital joint (elbow) in dogs: 44 cases (1978-1988)

M. G. O'Brien From the Department of Surgery, School of Veterinary Medicine Tufts University 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536 (O'Brien, Boudrieau, Clark), and the Angell Memorial Animal Hospital 350 S Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 01230 (O'Brien, Clark).

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R. J. Boudrieau From the Department of Surgery, School of Veterinary Medicine Tufts University 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536 (O'Brien, Boudrieau, Clark), and the Angell Memorial Animal Hospital 350 S Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 01230 (O'Brien, Clark).

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G. N. Clark From the Department of Surgery, School of Veterinary Medicine Tufts University 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536 (O'Brien, Boudrieau, Clark), and the Angell Memorial Animal Hospital 350 S Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 01230 (O'Brien, Clark).

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Summary

The medical records from 44 dogs with traumatic luxation of the cubital joint were reviewed. Closed reduction was performed in 35 dogs, and open reduction in 9 dogs. Excellent or good results were achieved in 31 of 35 dogs (88.6%) treated by closed reduction and in 5 of 9 dogs (55.6%) treated by open reduction. Collateral ligament repair, performed in 5 dogs, did not appear to affect the prognosis. Factors such as body weight and type and duration of external coaptation also did not appear to influence the outcome. Increased dysfunction associated with open reduction most likely was caused by the chronic nature of the dislocation, iatrogenic damage to the articular cartilage during reduction, or both. A good prognosis for return to normal function with minimal gait abnormality can be expected in most cases of traumatic luxation of the cubital joint treated by early closed reduction.

Summary

The medical records from 44 dogs with traumatic luxation of the cubital joint were reviewed. Closed reduction was performed in 35 dogs, and open reduction in 9 dogs. Excellent or good results were achieved in 31 of 35 dogs (88.6%) treated by closed reduction and in 5 of 9 dogs (55.6%) treated by open reduction. Collateral ligament repair, performed in 5 dogs, did not appear to affect the prognosis. Factors such as body weight and type and duration of external coaptation also did not appear to influence the outcome. Increased dysfunction associated with open reduction most likely was caused by the chronic nature of the dislocation, iatrogenic damage to the articular cartilage during reduction, or both. A good prognosis for return to normal function with minimal gait abnormality can be expected in most cases of traumatic luxation of the cubital joint treated by early closed reduction.

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