Results of surgical management of portosystemic shunts in dogs: 20 cases (1985-1990)

Darien Lawrence From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0126.

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Jamie R. Bellah From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0126.

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Ricardo Diaz From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0126.

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Summary

Serum bile acid (SBA) values were obtained in 20 dogs, 2.5 to 60 months (mean, 18.6 months) after surgery for occlusion of a congenital portosystemic shunt. The SBA values obtained after food was withheld were significantly (P < 0.005) reduced at follow-up, compared with preoperative values. In 85% of the dogs (17/20), response to surgery was graded by the owners as excellent or good, although most dogs had abnormal SBA values at follow-up. Significant difference in clinical results or follow-up SBA values was not found in dogs that had complete or partial occlusion of the shunting vessel. Correlation between clinical results and SBA values also was not detected. Dogs that were > 2 years old at the time of diagnosis and surgery had a significantly (P = 0.012) poorer clinical result than that of dogs < 1 year old.

Summary

Serum bile acid (SBA) values were obtained in 20 dogs, 2.5 to 60 months (mean, 18.6 months) after surgery for occlusion of a congenital portosystemic shunt. The SBA values obtained after food was withheld were significantly (P < 0.005) reduced at follow-up, compared with preoperative values. In 85% of the dogs (17/20), response to surgery was graded by the owners as excellent or good, although most dogs had abnormal SBA values at follow-up. Significant difference in clinical results or follow-up SBA values was not found in dogs that had complete or partial occlusion of the shunting vessel. Correlation between clinical results and SBA values also was not detected. Dogs that were > 2 years old at the time of diagnosis and surgery had a significantly (P = 0.012) poorer clinical result than that of dogs < 1 year old.

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