Prevalence, type, and importance of splenic diseases in dogs: 1,480 cases (1985-1989)

W. L. Spangler From the California Veterinary Diagnostics Inc, 3911 W Capitol Ave, West Sacramento, CA 95691.

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 DVM, PhD
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M. R. Culbertson From the California Veterinary Diagnostics Inc, 3911 W Capitol Ave, West Sacramento, CA 95691.

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Summary

The prevalence data of splenic diseases from 3 sources were studied. Group 1 consisted of a general diagnostic survey of accessions submitted from private veterinary hospitals in California during a period of approximately 4 years and included 1,372 submissions of canine splenic tissue. Group 2 consisted of surgical splenectomy specimens from 92 dogs; the specimens were submitted to the laboratory for gross and histologic evaluation prior to fixation, and a questionnaire was subsequently sent to determine the outcome of the disease. Group 3 was made up of specimens of 105 splenic lesions derived from a large colony of Beagles with complete medical records and records of pathologic findings.

In this study, splenic hematoma and hyperplastic nodule, not hemangiosarcoma, made up the bulk of splenic lesions. Hemangiosarcoma was the most frequent neoplasm of the canine spleen, but the combined prevalence of all other splenic neoplasms was similar to that of hemangiosarcoma alone. Splenic hematoma and hemangiosarcoma were grossly indistinguishable in most cases. Hyperplastic lymphoid nodules and hematomas of the spleen appeared to represent a continuum. If that finding was correlated with microscopic splenic blood flow, specific causal relationship could be suggested. Prognostically, the live/dead ratio and mean survival of dogs with various splenic lesions differed significantly.

Summary

The prevalence data of splenic diseases from 3 sources were studied. Group 1 consisted of a general diagnostic survey of accessions submitted from private veterinary hospitals in California during a period of approximately 4 years and included 1,372 submissions of canine splenic tissue. Group 2 consisted of surgical splenectomy specimens from 92 dogs; the specimens were submitted to the laboratory for gross and histologic evaluation prior to fixation, and a questionnaire was subsequently sent to determine the outcome of the disease. Group 3 was made up of specimens of 105 splenic lesions derived from a large colony of Beagles with complete medical records and records of pathologic findings.

In this study, splenic hematoma and hyperplastic nodule, not hemangiosarcoma, made up the bulk of splenic lesions. Hemangiosarcoma was the most frequent neoplasm of the canine spleen, but the combined prevalence of all other splenic neoplasms was similar to that of hemangiosarcoma alone. Splenic hematoma and hemangiosarcoma were grossly indistinguishable in most cases. Hyperplastic lymphoid nodules and hematomas of the spleen appeared to represent a continuum. If that finding was correlated with microscopic splenic blood flow, specific causal relationship could be suggested. Prognostically, the live/dead ratio and mean survival of dogs with various splenic lesions differed significantly.

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