Treatment of dogs with osteosarcoma by administration of cisplatin after amputation or limb-sparing surgery: 22 cases (1987-1990)

John Berg From the Departments of Surgery (Berg, Weinstein) and Pathology (Schelling), School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536 and the Department of Community Health (Rand), School of Medicine, Tufts University, 136 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA 02111.

Search for other papers by John Berg in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
M. Joy Weinstein From the Departments of Surgery (Berg, Weinstein) and Pathology (Schelling), School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536 and the Department of Community Health (Rand), School of Medicine, Tufts University, 136 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA 02111.

Search for other papers by M. Joy Weinstein in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 VMD
,
Scott H. Schelling From the Departments of Surgery (Berg, Weinstein) and Pathology (Schelling), School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536 and the Department of Community Health (Rand), School of Medicine, Tufts University, 136 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA 02111.

Search for other papers by Scott H. Schelling in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
, and
William M. Rand From the Departments of Surgery (Berg, Weinstein) and Pathology (Schelling), School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, 200 Westboro Rd, North Grafton, MA 01536 and the Department of Community Health (Rand), School of Medicine, Tufts University, 136 Harrison Ave, Boston, MA 02111.

Search for other papers by William M. Rand in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

Twenty-two dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma were treated by amputation (n = 17) or limb-sparing surgery (n = 5). All dogs were given cisplatin (60 mg/m2 of body surface, iv) at 3-week inervals, beginning 1 week after surgery. Number of cisplatin treatments ranged from 1 to 6. Survival data for the 22 dogs were compared with survival data from a historical control group consisting of 162 dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma treated by amputation alone.

Median survival time for the 22 dogs given cisplatin was estimated to be 46.4 weeks, and 1- and 2-year survival rates were estimated to be 45.5 and 20.9%, respectively. Survival time was significantly (P < 0.0001) longer for treated dogs than for control dogs. Statistically significant relation was not found between survival time and number of cisplatin treatments.

Three dogs were alive with no evidence of disease at the time of reporting. Of the remaining 19 dogs, 14 (73.4%) were euthanatized for problems documented to be related to metastases. Nine (47.4%) dogs were euthanatized because of bone metastases, and 5 (26.3%) were euthanatized because of pulmonary metastases. The proportion of dogs euthanatized because of bone metastases was significantly (P < 0.0001) higher for treated than for control dogs. Median survival times for dogs developing bone and lung metastases were estimated to be 51.2 weeks and 21.2 weeks, respectively; however, this difference was not statistically significant.

One local tumor recurrence was observed among dogs that had limb-sparing surgery. Significant difference in survival time was not observed between dogs that had limb-sparing surgery and dogs that underwent amputation.

Summary

Twenty-two dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma were treated by amputation (n = 17) or limb-sparing surgery (n = 5). All dogs were given cisplatin (60 mg/m2 of body surface, iv) at 3-week inervals, beginning 1 week after surgery. Number of cisplatin treatments ranged from 1 to 6. Survival data for the 22 dogs were compared with survival data from a historical control group consisting of 162 dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma treated by amputation alone.

Median survival time for the 22 dogs given cisplatin was estimated to be 46.4 weeks, and 1- and 2-year survival rates were estimated to be 45.5 and 20.9%, respectively. Survival time was significantly (P < 0.0001) longer for treated dogs than for control dogs. Statistically significant relation was not found between survival time and number of cisplatin treatments.

Three dogs were alive with no evidence of disease at the time of reporting. Of the remaining 19 dogs, 14 (73.4%) were euthanatized for problems documented to be related to metastases. Nine (47.4%) dogs were euthanatized because of bone metastases, and 5 (26.3%) were euthanatized because of pulmonary metastases. The proportion of dogs euthanatized because of bone metastases was significantly (P < 0.0001) higher for treated than for control dogs. Median survival times for dogs developing bone and lung metastases were estimated to be 51.2 weeks and 21.2 weeks, respectively; however, this difference was not statistically significant.

One local tumor recurrence was observed among dogs that had limb-sparing surgery. Significant difference in survival time was not observed between dogs that had limb-sparing surgery and dogs that underwent amputation.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 387 387 81
PDF Downloads 64 64 14
Advertisement