Effects of lasalocid on coccidial infection and growth in young dairy calves

Glendon D. Sinks From the Department of Animal Science, Agricultural Experiment Station (Sinks, Quigley), and the Department of Environmental Practice, College of Veterinary Medicine (Reinemeyer), University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901.

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James D. Quigley III From the Department of Animal Science, Agricultural Experiment Station (Sinks, Quigley), and the Department of Environmental Practice, College of Veterinary Medicine (Reinemeyer), University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901.

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Craig R. Reinemeyer From the Department of Animal Science, Agricultural Experiment Station (Sinks, Quigley), and the Department of Environmental Practice, College of Veterinary Medicine (Reinemeyer), University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901.

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Summary

Effects of lasalocid on coccidial infection and on calf growth were examined in 16 Holstein bull calves. Calves were assigned randomly to a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of starter ration containing 0 or 40 mg of lasalocid/kg of starter, beginning when calves were 3 days old (se = 0.046), and single oral inoculation with 0 or 30,000 sporulated oocysts (Eimeria bovis) at 28 days. Pelleted calf starter was fed ad libitum from day 1; milk replacer was fed at a rate of 3.6 kg/d until day 28. Mean daily gain, dry-matter intake, and body weight were increased in calves fed lasalocid and decreased in those inoculated with coccidia. Addition of lasalocid to the feed improved gains by 8% in uninoculated calves and by 50% in inoculated calves. Fecal oocyst numbers were reduced when lasalocid was fed to inoculated calves. Feces were more abnormal in calves inoculated with coccidia. Respiration rates, rectal temperatures, pcv, and serum sodium and potassium concentrations were unaffected by treatment. On the basis of findings in this study, lasalocid minimized effects of coccidial challenge inoculation and increased growth of calves.

Summary

Effects of lasalocid on coccidial infection and on calf growth were examined in 16 Holstein bull calves. Calves were assigned randomly to a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of starter ration containing 0 or 40 mg of lasalocid/kg of starter, beginning when calves were 3 days old (se = 0.046), and single oral inoculation with 0 or 30,000 sporulated oocysts (Eimeria bovis) at 28 days. Pelleted calf starter was fed ad libitum from day 1; milk replacer was fed at a rate of 3.6 kg/d until day 28. Mean daily gain, dry-matter intake, and body weight were increased in calves fed lasalocid and decreased in those inoculated with coccidia. Addition of lasalocid to the feed improved gains by 8% in uninoculated calves and by 50% in inoculated calves. Fecal oocyst numbers were reduced when lasalocid was fed to inoculated calves. Feces were more abnormal in calves inoculated with coccidia. Respiration rates, rectal temperatures, pcv, and serum sodium and potassium concentrations were unaffected by treatment. On the basis of findings in this study, lasalocid minimized effects of coccidial challenge inoculation and increased growth of calves.

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