Economic impact of an epizootic of pseudorabies in a commercial swine herd in Ohio, achieving test negative status and quarantine release by use of vaccination and test and removal

Steen Bech-Nielsen From the Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 1900 Coffey Rd, Columbus, OH 43210-1092 (Bech-Nielsen, Miller, Bowman, Orloski-Snider), and The Ohio Department of Agriculture, Division of Animal Industry, Reynoldsburg, OH 43068-3399 (Dodaro).

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Gay Y. Miller From the Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 1900 Coffey Rd, Columbus, OH 43210-1092 (Bech-Nielsen, Miller, Bowman, Orloski-Snider), and The Ohio Department of Agriculture, Division of Animal Industry, Reynoldsburg, OH 43068-3399 (Dodaro).

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Gary L. Bowman From the Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 1900 Coffey Rd, Columbus, OH 43210-1092 (Bech-Nielsen, Miller, Bowman, Orloski-Snider), and The Ohio Department of Agriculture, Division of Animal Industry, Reynoldsburg, OH 43068-3399 (Dodaro).

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Stephen J. Dodaro From the Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 1900 Coffey Rd, Columbus, OH 43210-1092 (Bech-Nielsen, Miller, Bowman, Orloski-Snider), and The Ohio Department of Agriculture, Division of Animal Industry, Reynoldsburg, OH 43068-3399 (Dodaro).

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Kathleen A. Orloski-Snider From the Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 1900 Coffey Rd, Columbus, OH 43210-1092 (Bech-Nielsen, Miller, Bowman, Orloski-Snider), and The Ohio Department of Agriculture, Division of Animal Industry, Reynoldsburg, OH 43068-3399 (Dodaro).

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Summary

The effect of pseudorabies in a commercial farrow-to-finish operation on selected production and economic values was estimated. Pseudorabies was first diagnosed in this herd by circle testing done in March 1988, as a required part of follow up from another herd that had been diagnosed with pseudorabies in the area. A pseudorabies virus vaccination program was initiated in the herd at that time.

The mean litter size of pigs born alive varied from 9.26 to 10.02 pigs/litter throughout the study period; however, there was a twofold increase in suckling pig mortality and a 2.6-fold increase in nursery pig mortality when the months of the epizootic were compared with pre-epizootic months. In the 6-month period following the epizootic, suckling pig mortality was threefold higher than that reported in the preepizootic months.

Total net loss for this operation was estimated at $99,700 from when the epizootic started until eradication, when calculating losses directly. The major economic losses (76.5% of total loss) were related to suckling pig mortality, which was $16,240 during the epizootic or $24/inventoried sow/week; $19,395 in the 6 months following the epizootic or $3.8/inventoried sow/week; and $40,628 thereafter until eradication 26 months later or $0.37/inventoried sow/week. Nursery pig mortality losses were 12.6% of total net losses; $754 during the epizootic, $357 in the 6 months after the enzootic, and $11,444 thereafter until eradication 26 months later. Sow culling and deaths accounted for 9.4% of net losses that took place from 6 months after the epizootic until eradication. In that same period, market hog deaths accounted for the remaining 1.2%, or $1,227 of the net losses.

When calculating economic losses indirectly by using hogs marketed/sow/year during, and after the pseudorabies epizootic until eradication, total net losses were $85,520. Losses from decreased hog production was $4,156 during the epizootic and $12,000 for the 6 months following the epizootic. From then until eradication, losses were $3,817 for the last 2 months in 1988, $23,969 for 1989, and $41,578 for 1990.

Summary

The effect of pseudorabies in a commercial farrow-to-finish operation on selected production and economic values was estimated. Pseudorabies was first diagnosed in this herd by circle testing done in March 1988, as a required part of follow up from another herd that had been diagnosed with pseudorabies in the area. A pseudorabies virus vaccination program was initiated in the herd at that time.

The mean litter size of pigs born alive varied from 9.26 to 10.02 pigs/litter throughout the study period; however, there was a twofold increase in suckling pig mortality and a 2.6-fold increase in nursery pig mortality when the months of the epizootic were compared with pre-epizootic months. In the 6-month period following the epizootic, suckling pig mortality was threefold higher than that reported in the preepizootic months.

Total net loss for this operation was estimated at $99,700 from when the epizootic started until eradication, when calculating losses directly. The major economic losses (76.5% of total loss) were related to suckling pig mortality, which was $16,240 during the epizootic or $24/inventoried sow/week; $19,395 in the 6 months following the epizootic or $3.8/inventoried sow/week; and $40,628 thereafter until eradication 26 months later or $0.37/inventoried sow/week. Nursery pig mortality losses were 12.6% of total net losses; $754 during the epizootic, $357 in the 6 months after the enzootic, and $11,444 thereafter until eradication 26 months later. Sow culling and deaths accounted for 9.4% of net losses that took place from 6 months after the epizootic until eradication. In that same period, market hog deaths accounted for the remaining 1.2%, or $1,227 of the net losses.

When calculating economic losses indirectly by using hogs marketed/sow/year during, and after the pseudorabies epizootic until eradication, total net losses were $85,520. Losses from decreased hog production was $4,156 during the epizootic and $12,000 for the 6 months following the epizootic. From then until eradication, losses were $3,817 for the last 2 months in 1988, $23,969 for 1989, and $41,578 for 1990.

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