Follow-up study of owner attitudes toward home care of paraplegic dogs

Michael Bauer From the Center for Paralysis Research (Bauer, Toombs, Golden, Skowronek), Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Bauer, Toombs), Center for Applied Ethology and Human-Animal Interaction (N. Glickman) and Department of Veterinary Pathology (L. Glickman), School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-7403.

Search for other papers by Michael Bauer in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Nita Glickman From the Center for Paralysis Research (Bauer, Toombs, Golden, Skowronek), Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Bauer, Toombs), Center for Applied Ethology and Human-Animal Interaction (N. Glickman) and Department of Veterinary Pathology (L. Glickman), School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-7403.

Search for other papers by Nita Glickman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 MS, MPH
,
Larry Glickman From the Center for Paralysis Research (Bauer, Toombs, Golden, Skowronek), Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Bauer, Toombs), Center for Applied Ethology and Human-Animal Interaction (N. Glickman) and Department of Veterinary Pathology (L. Glickman), School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-7403.

Search for other papers by Larry Glickman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 MPH, VMD
,
James Toombs From the Center for Paralysis Research (Bauer, Toombs, Golden, Skowronek), Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Bauer, Toombs), Center for Applied Ethology and Human-Animal Interaction (N. Glickman) and Department of Veterinary Pathology (L. Glickman), School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-7403.

Search for other papers by James Toombs in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Scott Golden From the Center for Paralysis Research (Bauer, Toombs, Golden, Skowronek), Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Bauer, Toombs), Center for Applied Ethology and Human-Animal Interaction (N. Glickman) and Department of Veterinary Pathology (L. Glickman), School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-7403.

Search for other papers by Scott Golden in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Cindy Skowronek From the Center for Paralysis Research (Bauer, Toombs, Golden, Skowronek), Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Bauer, Toombs), Center for Applied Ethology and Human-Animal Interaction (N. Glickman) and Department of Veterinary Pathology (L. Glickman), School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-7403.

Search for other papers by Cindy Skowronek in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

A questionnaire was mailed to 30 owners of paraplegic dogs who had been caring for their dogs at home for 3 to 72 months. It was designed to collect information on demographic variables, duration of ownership and paralysis, age of the pet, pet/owner relationship, owner expectations and perceptions of the pet's quality of life, problems the pet experienced, effect that maintaining a paralyzed pet had on the owners' quality of life, and whether use of a cart was beneficial.

Significant correlation was found between prior expectations that the pet would lead a high-quality life and perception that the pet, in fact, had a high quality of life during paralysis (r2 = 0.61, P = 0.01). Owners who had anticipated that extra work would be necessary to care for their paraplegic dog had a more positive attitude toward home care (r2 = 0.55, P = 0.03).

Overall, owners involved in the study were satisfied with all aspects of maintaining paraplegic dogs at home. Our findings support the feasibility of dedicated owners successfully maintaining small (average body weight, 9 kg) paraplegic dogs at home for extended periods.

Summary

A questionnaire was mailed to 30 owners of paraplegic dogs who had been caring for their dogs at home for 3 to 72 months. It was designed to collect information on demographic variables, duration of ownership and paralysis, age of the pet, pet/owner relationship, owner expectations and perceptions of the pet's quality of life, problems the pet experienced, effect that maintaining a paralyzed pet had on the owners' quality of life, and whether use of a cart was beneficial.

Significant correlation was found between prior expectations that the pet would lead a high-quality life and perception that the pet, in fact, had a high quality of life during paralysis (r2 = 0.61, P = 0.01). Owners who had anticipated that extra work would be necessary to care for their paraplegic dog had a more positive attitude toward home care (r2 = 0.55, P = 0.03).

Overall, owners involved in the study were satisfied with all aspects of maintaining paraplegic dogs at home. Our findings support the feasibility of dedicated owners successfully maintaining small (average body weight, 9 kg) paraplegic dogs at home for extended periods.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 347 347 73
PDF Downloads 45 45 1
Advertisement