Effect of topically administered atropine on tear production in dogs

Steven R. Hollingsworth From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Hollingsworth) and the Departments of Surgery (Canton, Buyukmihci) and Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine (Farver), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Steven R. Hollingsworth in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
David D. Canton From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Hollingsworth) and the Departments of Surgery (Canton, Buyukmihci) and Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine (Farver), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by David D. Canton in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Nedim C. Buyukmihci From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Hollingsworth) and the Departments of Surgery (Canton, Buyukmihci) and Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine (Farver), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Nedim C. Buyukmihci in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 VMD
, and
Thomas B. Farver From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Hollingsworth) and the Departments of Surgery (Canton, Buyukmihci) and Epidemiology and Preventative Medicine (Farver), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Thomas B. Farver in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

Baseline tear production values were established for both eyes of 19 dogs, using the Schirmer tear test. Atropine sulfate, 1% solution, was administered topically in the left eye of each dog once daily for 14 days. Tear production was then determined for both eyes at 15, 30, 60, 120, 180, 240, and 300 minutes, and 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 days. A final Schirmer tear test reading was obtained for each eye 5 weeks after the last atropine treatment to check for the possibility of prolonged effect. Both eyes had statistically significant (P < 0.05) decrease in tear production that was most marked at 120 minutes after atropine instillation, then returned to baseline values by 300 minutes after instillation. Although atropine was placed in the left eye only, statistically significant difference was not apparent in Schirmer tear test values between the left and right eyes. Tear production continued to decrease in both eyes over time, becoming statistically significant (P < 0.05) on day 9. However, on days 12 and 15, tear production in the untreated eye plateaued, but that in the treated eye continued to decrease. Five weeks after the last treatment with atropine, both eyes still had a statistically significant (P < 0.05) decrease in tear production, although Schirmer tear test values had increased from day-15 values and appeared to be returning to baseline. Association was not evident between age or body weight and magnitude of response to topically applied atropine.

Summary

Baseline tear production values were established for both eyes of 19 dogs, using the Schirmer tear test. Atropine sulfate, 1% solution, was administered topically in the left eye of each dog once daily for 14 days. Tear production was then determined for both eyes at 15, 30, 60, 120, 180, 240, and 300 minutes, and 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 days. A final Schirmer tear test reading was obtained for each eye 5 weeks after the last atropine treatment to check for the possibility of prolonged effect. Both eyes had statistically significant (P < 0.05) decrease in tear production that was most marked at 120 minutes after atropine instillation, then returned to baseline values by 300 minutes after instillation. Although atropine was placed in the left eye only, statistically significant difference was not apparent in Schirmer tear test values between the left and right eyes. Tear production continued to decrease in both eyes over time, becoming statistically significant (P < 0.05) on day 9. However, on days 12 and 15, tear production in the untreated eye plateaued, but that in the treated eye continued to decrease. Five weeks after the last treatment with atropine, both eyes still had a statistically significant (P < 0.05) decrease in tear production, although Schirmer tear test values had increased from day-15 values and appeared to be returning to baseline. Association was not evident between age or body weight and magnitude of response to topically applied atropine.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 231 231 84
PDF Downloads 28 28 6
Advertisement