Metallic foreign bodies in the mouth or pharynx of horses: Seven cases (1983-1989)

Mary Lou Kiper From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Kiper, Traub-Dargatz, Bennett) and the Department of Radiology and Radiobiology (Wrigley), Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, 300 W Drake Rd, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Search for other papers by Mary Lou Kiper in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Robert Wrigley From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Kiper, Traub-Dargatz, Bennett) and the Department of Radiology and Radiobiology (Wrigley), Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, 300 W Drake Rd, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Search for other papers by Robert Wrigley in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVSc, MS
,
Josie Traub-Dargatz From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Kiper, Traub-Dargatz, Bennett) and the Department of Radiology and Radiobiology (Wrigley), Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, 300 W Drake Rd, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Search for other papers by Josie Traub-Dargatz in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
, and
Dwight Bennett From the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Kiper, Traub-Dargatz, Bennett) and the Department of Radiology and Radiobiology (Wrigley), Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, 300 W Drake Rd, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Search for other papers by Dwight Bennett in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

Seven horses with metallic foreign bodies in the mouth or pharynx were examined at the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital from 1983 to 1989. The horses had variable clinical signs, such as purulent nasal discharge, swelling of the throatlatch area, and dyspnea. Most of the horses had clinical signs for more than 2 weeks, and had no or only temporary improvement with conservative medical treatment (antibiotics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). The definitive diagnostic test in all of the cases was radiography, which also aided in the plan for surgical removal of the foreign body. Once the foreign body was removed from each of the horses, their clinical signs resolved. Most of the foreign bodies were small pieces of wire, the sources of which could not be determined, but that may have been incorporated in baled hay.

Summary

Seven horses with metallic foreign bodies in the mouth or pharynx were examined at the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital from 1983 to 1989. The horses had variable clinical signs, such as purulent nasal discharge, swelling of the throatlatch area, and dyspnea. Most of the horses had clinical signs for more than 2 weeks, and had no or only temporary improvement with conservative medical treatment (antibiotics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). The definitive diagnostic test in all of the cases was radiography, which also aided in the plan for surgical removal of the foreign body. Once the foreign body was removed from each of the horses, their clinical signs resolved. Most of the foreign bodies were small pieces of wire, the sources of which could not be determined, but that may have been incorporated in baled hay.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 470 470 114
PDF Downloads 37 37 2
Advertisement