Effects of castration on chronic bacterial prostatitis in dogs

Laine A. Cowan From the Departments of Small Animal Medicine (Cowan, Barsanti), Pathology (Crowell), and Medical Microbiology (Brown), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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Jeanne A. Barsanti From the Departments of Small Animal Medicine (Cowan, Barsanti), Pathology (Crowell), and Medical Microbiology (Brown), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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Wayne Crowell From the Departments of Small Animal Medicine (Cowan, Barsanti), Pathology (Crowell), and Medical Microbiology (Brown), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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John Brown From the Departments of Small Animal Medicine (Cowan, Barsanti), Pathology (Crowell), and Medical Microbiology (Brown), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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Summary

An Escherichia coli bacterial prostatitis was experimentally induced in dogs to determine the effect of castration on chronic bacterial prostatitis. Two weeks after instillation of bacteria directly into the prostate gland, 17 of 22 adult mixed-breed male dogs had positive urine or prostatic fluid cultures or both. Seven of the 17 dogs were randomly chosen to be castrated, and 10 of the 17 served as sham-operated controls.

At weekly intervals, urine was obtained from 17 dogs for aerobic microbiologic culturing. At each week, dogs with no bacterial growth in the cultured urine had prostatic fluid collected for aerobic microbiologic culture. Dogs with negative urine, prostatic fluid, and prostatic tissue needle biopsy culture results at week 7 were euthanatized. For remaining dogs, weekly cultures were continued until the dogs were euthanatized at week 12. None of the 7 castrated dogs and 6 of the 10 dogs subject to sham operation had prostatic infection at the time of necropsy. The castrated dogs had a mean infection duration of 4.2 weeks, which was statistically shorter than the 9.5 week mean duration of infection in the sham-operated controls.

Cultures of prostatic tissue obtained immediately after euthanasia correlated 100% with urine and prostatic fluid cultures taken before euthanasia. All of the 6 dogs with positive prostatic cultures at termination had moderate to marked lymphoplasmacytic chronic prostatitis. The 11 dogs that were not infected at the end of the study had normal to moderate lymphoplasmacytic chronic prostatitis on histologic examination.

Because castration reduced the duration of infection and resulted in fewer bacterial colony forming units per milliliter of urine, castration appears to be beneficial in the resolution of chronic bacterial prostatitis in this experimental model.

Summary

An Escherichia coli bacterial prostatitis was experimentally induced in dogs to determine the effect of castration on chronic bacterial prostatitis. Two weeks after instillation of bacteria directly into the prostate gland, 17 of 22 adult mixed-breed male dogs had positive urine or prostatic fluid cultures or both. Seven of the 17 dogs were randomly chosen to be castrated, and 10 of the 17 served as sham-operated controls.

At weekly intervals, urine was obtained from 17 dogs for aerobic microbiologic culturing. At each week, dogs with no bacterial growth in the cultured urine had prostatic fluid collected for aerobic microbiologic culture. Dogs with negative urine, prostatic fluid, and prostatic tissue needle biopsy culture results at week 7 were euthanatized. For remaining dogs, weekly cultures were continued until the dogs were euthanatized at week 12. None of the 7 castrated dogs and 6 of the 10 dogs subject to sham operation had prostatic infection at the time of necropsy. The castrated dogs had a mean infection duration of 4.2 weeks, which was statistically shorter than the 9.5 week mean duration of infection in the sham-operated controls.

Cultures of prostatic tissue obtained immediately after euthanasia correlated 100% with urine and prostatic fluid cultures taken before euthanasia. All of the 6 dogs with positive prostatic cultures at termination had moderate to marked lymphoplasmacytic chronic prostatitis. The 11 dogs that were not infected at the end of the study had normal to moderate lymphoplasmacytic chronic prostatitis on histologic examination.

Because castration reduced the duration of infection and resulted in fewer bacterial colony forming units per milliliter of urine, castration appears to be beneficial in the resolution of chronic bacterial prostatitis in this experimental model.

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