Clinical evaluation of cats with lower urinary tract disease

John M. Kruger From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Kruger, Osborne, Johnston), Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation (Goyal), Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Wickstrom), Veterinary Pathobiology (Brown), and Veterinary Biology (Fletcher), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.

Search for other papers by John M. Kruger in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Carl A. Osborne From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Kruger, Osborne, Johnston), Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation (Goyal), Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Wickstrom), Veterinary Pathobiology (Brown), and Veterinary Biology (Fletcher), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.

Search for other papers by Carl A. Osborne in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Sagar M. Goyal From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Kruger, Osborne, Johnston), Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation (Goyal), Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Wickstrom), Veterinary Pathobiology (Brown), and Veterinary Biology (Fletcher), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.

Search for other papers by Sagar M. Goyal in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVSc, PhD
,
Steven L. Wickstrom From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Kruger, Osborne, Johnston), Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation (Goyal), Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Wickstrom), Veterinary Pathobiology (Brown), and Veterinary Biology (Fletcher), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.

Search for other papers by Steven L. Wickstrom in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 MS
,
Gary R. Johnston From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Kruger, Osborne, Johnston), Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation (Goyal), Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Wickstrom), Veterinary Pathobiology (Brown), and Veterinary Biology (Fletcher), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.

Search for other papers by Gary R. Johnston in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Thomas F. Fletcher From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Kruger, Osborne, Johnston), Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation (Goyal), Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Wickstrom), Veterinary Pathobiology (Brown), and Veterinary Biology (Fletcher), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.

Search for other papers by Thomas F. Fletcher in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
, and
Patricia A. Brown From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Kruger, Osborne, Johnston), Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation (Goyal), Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Wickstrom), Veterinary Pathobiology (Brown), and Veterinary Biology (Fletcher), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.

Search for other papers by Patricia A. Brown in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BS

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

In a prospective study, 141 cats with hematuria, dysuria, urethral obstruction, or combinations of these signs were evaluated by contemporary diagnostic methods and compared with 26 clinically normal cats (controls). Specific diagnosis was established in 45% (64/141) of cats affected with lower urinary tract disease (lutd). Crystalline matrix plug-induced urethral obstruction was diagnosed in 21% (30/141) of affected cats, uroliths were identified in 21% (30/141) of affected cats, uroliths with concomitant bacterial urinary tract infection (uti) were identified in < 2% (2/141) of affected cats, and bacterial uti alone was identified in < 2% (2/141) of cats with lutd. Viruses, mycoplasmas, and ureaplasmas were not isolated from urine samples collected from affected or control cats.

Bovine herpesvirus 4 (bhv-4)-neutralizing antibodies were not detected in any serum sample obtained from cats with lutd or from control cats. In contrast, bhv-4 antibodies were detected by an indirect immunofluorescent antibody (ifa) test in sera obtained from 31% (44/141) of cats with lutd and 23% (6/26) of control cats. The prevalence of positive bhv-4 ifa test results in affected cats was not significantly different from that observed in control cats. Significant association was not apparent between positive bhv-4 ifa test results and clinical diagnosis, abnormal laboratory findings, or cat age. However, the number of male cats with bhv-4 ifa titer was significantly (P < 0.02, χ2 test) greater than that of female cats. Detection of bhv-4 antibodies in approximately 30% of affected and control cats indicates prior virus exposure. Further investigations are warranted to clarify the specific role of bhv-4 in cats with naturally acquired lutd.

Summary

In a prospective study, 141 cats with hematuria, dysuria, urethral obstruction, or combinations of these signs were evaluated by contemporary diagnostic methods and compared with 26 clinically normal cats (controls). Specific diagnosis was established in 45% (64/141) of cats affected with lower urinary tract disease (lutd). Crystalline matrix plug-induced urethral obstruction was diagnosed in 21% (30/141) of affected cats, uroliths were identified in 21% (30/141) of affected cats, uroliths with concomitant bacterial urinary tract infection (uti) were identified in < 2% (2/141) of affected cats, and bacterial uti alone was identified in < 2% (2/141) of cats with lutd. Viruses, mycoplasmas, and ureaplasmas were not isolated from urine samples collected from affected or control cats.

Bovine herpesvirus 4 (bhv-4)-neutralizing antibodies were not detected in any serum sample obtained from cats with lutd or from control cats. In contrast, bhv-4 antibodies were detected by an indirect immunofluorescent antibody (ifa) test in sera obtained from 31% (44/141) of cats with lutd and 23% (6/26) of control cats. The prevalence of positive bhv-4 ifa test results in affected cats was not significantly different from that observed in control cats. Significant association was not apparent between positive bhv-4 ifa test results and clinical diagnosis, abnormal laboratory findings, or cat age. However, the number of male cats with bhv-4 ifa titer was significantly (P < 0.02, χ2 test) greater than that of female cats. Detection of bhv-4 antibodies in approximately 30% of affected and control cats indicates prior virus exposure. Further investigations are warranted to clarify the specific role of bhv-4 in cats with naturally acquired lutd.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 424 424 163
PDF Downloads 233 233 55
Advertisement