Medical and surgical management of small-colon impaction in horses: 28 cases (1984-1989)

Alan J. Ruggles From the Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, New Bolton Center, 382 W Street Rd, Kennett Square, PA 19348.

Search for other papers by Alan J. Ruggles in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
and
Michael W. Ross From the Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, New Bolton Center, 382 W Street Rd, Kennett Square, PA 19348.

Search for other papers by Michael W. Ross in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

Medical records of 28 horses with impaction of the small colon were reviewed; 20 horses were admitted during the winter months. Diagnosis of small-colon impaction was made in 21 horses by rectal examination, and in 7 horses at exploratory celiotomy. Ten horses were treated medically, and 18 were treated surgically. Horses that were treated surgically were more likely to have abdominal distention than were those that responded to medical treatment (P < 0.025). Signs of greater degree of abdominal pain and higher heart rate were seen in horses treated surgically, but these values were not significantly different from values in medically treated horses. Duration of hospitalization was less in horses treated medically (P < 0.025). Long-term survival was higher for horses treated medically (P < 0.025). All horses treated medically and 7 of the horses treated surgically were alive at follow-up evaluation, at least 1 year after discharge. Fever and diarrhea were common complications after surgery. Four horses were fecal culture-positive for Salmonella sp after surgery. Early and aggressive medical management of horses with impaction of the small colon is recommended.

Summary

Medical records of 28 horses with impaction of the small colon were reviewed; 20 horses were admitted during the winter months. Diagnosis of small-colon impaction was made in 21 horses by rectal examination, and in 7 horses at exploratory celiotomy. Ten horses were treated medically, and 18 were treated surgically. Horses that were treated surgically were more likely to have abdominal distention than were those that responded to medical treatment (P < 0.025). Signs of greater degree of abdominal pain and higher heart rate were seen in horses treated surgically, but these values were not significantly different from values in medically treated horses. Duration of hospitalization was less in horses treated medically (P < 0.025). Long-term survival was higher for horses treated medically (P < 0.025). All horses treated medically and 7 of the horses treated surgically were alive at follow-up evaluation, at least 1 year after discharge. Fever and diarrhea were common complications after surgery. Four horses were fecal culture-positive for Salmonella sp after surgery. Early and aggressive medical management of horses with impaction of the small colon is recommended.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 331 331 89
PDF Downloads 67 67 16
Advertisement