Renosplenic entrapment of the large colon in horses: 57 cases (1983-1988)

A. N. Baird From the Department of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, Texas Veterinary Medical Center, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.

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N. D. Cohen From the Department of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, Texas Veterinary Medical Center, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.

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T. S. Taylor From the Department of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, Texas Veterinary Medical Center, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.

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J. P. Watkins From the Department of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, Texas Veterinary Medical Center, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.

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J. Schumacher From the Department of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, Texas Veterinary Medical Center, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.

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Summary

During a 5-year period, renosplenic entrapment of the large colon was diagnosed in 57 horses referred to the Texas Veterinary Medical Center. The signalment of and clinical signs of disease in these horses were compared with such variables in 200 horses referred for other types of colic. Findings did not support a male gender predilection for this disease, as was previously reported. The case survival rate was 93% for this group of horses. Fourteen of the horses were treated nonsurgically by rolling them clockwise while they were under general anesthesia. Data supported the safety and efficacy of nonsurgical treatment.

Summary

During a 5-year period, renosplenic entrapment of the large colon was diagnosed in 57 horses referred to the Texas Veterinary Medical Center. The signalment of and clinical signs of disease in these horses were compared with such variables in 200 horses referred for other types of colic. Findings did not support a male gender predilection for this disease, as was previously reported. The case survival rate was 93% for this group of horses. Fourteen of the horses were treated nonsurgically by rolling them clockwise while they were under general anesthesia. Data supported the safety and efficacy of nonsurgical treatment.

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