Soft tissue- and bone-phase scintigraphy for diagnosis of navicular disease in horses

Donald R. Trout From the Department of Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Donald R. Trout in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
William J. Hornof From the Department of Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by William J. Hornof in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
, and
Timothy R. O'Brien From the Department of Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Timothy R. O'Brien in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Summary

Radiography and soft tissue- and bone-phase scintigraphy were performed on 14 clinically normal horses and 35 horses in which definite, probable, or possible navicular disease had been diagnosed. The specificity of radiography and scintigraphy in revealing signs of navicular disease were nearly equal; however, the sensitivity of scintigraphy appeared to be greater than that of radiography. The greatest sensitivity and specificity were achieved when the results of radiography and scintigraphy were evaluated together. Differences in sensitivity were greatest when scintigraphy revealed lesions not detected by radiography. Although a diagnosis of navicular disease was sometimes made when only soft tissue-phase or only bone-phase scintigraphy revealed lesions, results obtained during the 2 phases generally were similar. It was concluded that scintigraphy can be a valuable aid in diagnosing navicular disease in horses, especially when radiographic findings do not support clinical findings.

Summary

Radiography and soft tissue- and bone-phase scintigraphy were performed on 14 clinically normal horses and 35 horses in which definite, probable, or possible navicular disease had been diagnosed. The specificity of radiography and scintigraphy in revealing signs of navicular disease were nearly equal; however, the sensitivity of scintigraphy appeared to be greater than that of radiography. The greatest sensitivity and specificity were achieved when the results of radiography and scintigraphy were evaluated together. Differences in sensitivity were greatest when scintigraphy revealed lesions not detected by radiography. Although a diagnosis of navicular disease was sometimes made when only soft tissue-phase or only bone-phase scintigraphy revealed lesions, results obtained during the 2 phases generally were similar. It was concluded that scintigraphy can be a valuable aid in diagnosing navicular disease in horses, especially when radiographic findings do not support clinical findings.

Advertisement