Accuracy of radiography of the reticulum for predicting surgical findings in adult dairy cattle with traumatic reticuloperitonitis: 123 cases (1981-1987)

S. L. Fubini From the Department of Clinical Sciences, New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853.

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A. E. Yeager From the Department of Clinical Sciences, New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853.

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H. O. Mohammed From the Department of Clinical Sciences, New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853.

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D. F. Smith From the Department of Clinical Sciences, New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853.

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Summary

Radiographic and surgical findings were compared in 123 cattle suspected of having traumatic reticuloperitonitis. Radiography of the reticulum proved to be a sensitive test for detection of a foreign body (fb). An abnormal fb position on a radiograph was a good predictor of fb perforation. If an fb was fully attached to a magnet, it was unlikely to be perforating the reticular wall. When abnormal reticulum size, abnormal reticulum location, and gas shadows adjacent to the reticulum were found simultaneously on a radiograph, hepatic or perireticular abscess was likely. Reticular radiography proved to be a useful diagnostic aid in cattle suspected of having traumatic reticuloperitonitis.

Summary

Radiographic and surgical findings were compared in 123 cattle suspected of having traumatic reticuloperitonitis. Radiography of the reticulum proved to be a sensitive test for detection of a foreign body (fb). An abnormal fb position on a radiograph was a good predictor of fb perforation. If an fb was fully attached to a magnet, it was unlikely to be perforating the reticular wall. When abnormal reticulum size, abnormal reticulum location, and gas shadows adjacent to the reticulum were found simultaneously on a radiograph, hepatic or perireticular abscess was likely. Reticular radiography proved to be a useful diagnostic aid in cattle suspected of having traumatic reticuloperitonitis.

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