Comparison of the effect of pneumonia detected during lifetime with pneumonia detected at slaughter on growth in swine

Elizabeth P. Noyes From the Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Noyes, Pijoan) and Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Feeney), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 385 Animal Science/Veterinary Medicine Bldg, 1988 Fitch Ave, St Paul, MN 55108.

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 DVM, MS
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Daniel A. Feeney From the Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Noyes, Pijoan) and Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Feeney), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 385 Animal Science/Veterinary Medicine Bldg, 1988 Fitch Ave, St Paul, MN 55108.

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Carlos Pijoan From the Departments of Large Animal Clinical Sciences (Noyes, Pijoan) and Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Feeney), College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, 385 Animal Science/Veterinary Medicine Bldg, 1988 Fitch Ave, St Paul, MN 55108.

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Summary

Pneumonia in swine has been studied mainly at slaughter or necropsy. However, when performing slaughter or postmortem examinations, assessment of the true prevalence or lifetime extent of pneumonia is at best speculative. Radiography was used to evaluate lungs from pigs 21 to 150 days old. Follow-up slaughter examination was performed on pigs 180 days old. Individual percentage of pneumonia observed over the life of each pig and at slaughter were added to yield lifetime pneumonia scores. A significant (P = 0.0001) negative effect of lifetime pneumonia on growth rate was found. By comparison, slaughter examination proved to be a poor indicator of lifetime pneumonia; lesions were found to progress and regress dynamically throughout the life of pigs.

Summary

Pneumonia in swine has been studied mainly at slaughter or necropsy. However, when performing slaughter or postmortem examinations, assessment of the true prevalence or lifetime extent of pneumonia is at best speculative. Radiography was used to evaluate lungs from pigs 21 to 150 days old. Follow-up slaughter examination was performed on pigs 180 days old. Individual percentage of pneumonia observed over the life of each pig and at slaughter were added to yield lifetime pneumonia scores. A significant (P = 0.0001) negative effect of lifetime pneumonia on growth rate was found. By comparison, slaughter examination proved to be a poor indicator of lifetime pneumonia; lesions were found to progress and regress dynamically throughout the life of pigs.

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