Rabies surveillance in the United States during 1989

Frances L. Reid-Sanden From the Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Contral, Atlanta, GA 30333.

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James G. Dobbins From the Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Contral, Atlanta, GA 30333.

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Jean S. Smith From the Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Contral, Atlanta, GA 30333.

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Daniel B. Fishbein From the Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Contral, Atlanta, GA 30333.

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Summary

In 1989, 4,808 cases of rabies in animals other than human beings were reported to the Centers for Disease Control, 1.8% more (4,724 to 4,808) than in 1988. Eighty-eight percent (4,224/4,808) of those affected were wild animals and 12% (584/4,808) were domestic animals. Cases were reported from 49 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico; Hawaii remained rabies-free. Skunks (1,657) continued to be the most commonly reported rabid wild animal. For the second consecutive year, more cats (212) were reported to be infected with rabies virus than any other domestic species. Compared with their 1988 reports, 5 states reported increases of greater than 100% (Alaska, 109%; New Jersey, 233%; Ohio, 133%; Oklahoma, 168%; and Washington, 125%), and 5 states reported decreases of greater than 50% (Connecticut, 63%; Mississippi, 56%; Montana, 67%; Nevada, 55%; and West Virginia, 53%) in 1989.

Summary

In 1989, 4,808 cases of rabies in animals other than human beings were reported to the Centers for Disease Control, 1.8% more (4,724 to 4,808) than in 1988. Eighty-eight percent (4,224/4,808) of those affected were wild animals and 12% (584/4,808) were domestic animals. Cases were reported from 49 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico; Hawaii remained rabies-free. Skunks (1,657) continued to be the most commonly reported rabid wild animal. For the second consecutive year, more cats (212) were reported to be infected with rabies virus than any other domestic species. Compared with their 1988 reports, 5 states reported increases of greater than 100% (Alaska, 109%; New Jersey, 233%; Ohio, 133%; Oklahoma, 168%; and Washington, 125%), and 5 states reported decreases of greater than 50% (Connecticut, 63%; Mississippi, 56%; Montana, 67%; Nevada, 55%; and West Virginia, 53%) in 1989.

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