Clinical and laboratory features of a severe form of von Willebrand disease in Shetland Sheepdogs

Sharon L. Raymond From the Wadsworth Center for Laboratories & Research, New York State Department of Health, PO Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509.

Search for other papers by Sharon L. Raymond in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BS
,
Douglas W. Jones From the Wadsworth Center for Laboratories & Research, New York State Department of Health, PO Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509.

Search for other papers by Douglas W. Jones in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BA
,
Marjory B. Brooks From the Wadsworth Center for Laboratories & Research, New York State Department of Health, PO Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509.

Search for other papers by Marjory B. Brooks in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
, and
W. Jean Dodds From the Wadsworth Center for Laboratories & Research, New York State Department of Health, PO Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509.

Search for other papers by W. Jean Dodds in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

Ten clinically affected Shetland Sheepdogs were evaluated to define their severe bleeding diathesis and were determined to have von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF:Ag) values < 0.1% by elisa assay. The virtual absence of vWF protein by elisa assay and on multimeric analysis was diagnostic of either homozygosity or probable double heterozygosity for the canine von Willebrand disease (vWD) gene. Clinically affected dogs have type-III vWD and are the offspring of 2 heterozygous parents carrying type-I vWD. Twenty-three percent (1,428 dogs) of the more than 6,000 Shetland Sheepdogs screened for vWD at our facility since 1982 tested within the heterozygous carrier range for the common type-I form of this inherited disorder. Veterinarians and breeders should be aware of the potential for bleeding associated with elective and medical procedures in Shetland Sheepdogs and should use caution when breeding carriers of vWD because of the risk of producing clinically affected offspring with severe type-III vWD.

Summary

Ten clinically affected Shetland Sheepdogs were evaluated to define their severe bleeding diathesis and were determined to have von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF:Ag) values < 0.1% by elisa assay. The virtual absence of vWF protein by elisa assay and on multimeric analysis was diagnostic of either homozygosity or probable double heterozygosity for the canine von Willebrand disease (vWD) gene. Clinically affected dogs have type-III vWD and are the offspring of 2 heterozygous parents carrying type-I vWD. Twenty-three percent (1,428 dogs) of the more than 6,000 Shetland Sheepdogs screened for vWD at our facility since 1982 tested within the heterozygous carrier range for the common type-I form of this inherited disorder. Veterinarians and breeders should be aware of the potential for bleeding associated with elective and medical procedures in Shetland Sheepdogs and should use caution when breeding carriers of vWD because of the risk of producing clinically affected offspring with severe type-III vWD.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 324 324 83
PDF Downloads 42 42 13
Advertisement