Evaluation of a scheme for predicting the gram-staining reaction of organisms causing bovine mastitis

Gary F. Jones From the Marshfield Veterinary Service, Marshfield, WI 54449 (Jones), and the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108 (Ward).

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G. E. Ward From the Marshfield Veterinary Service, Marshfield, WI 54449 (Jones), and the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108 (Ward).

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Summary

The accuracy of a scheme for predicting the gram-staining reaction of organisms causing bovine mastitis in cows with systemic signs of disease (anorexia) was evaluated over 1 year. Criteria for making the predictions included: season of year, stage of lactation, appearance of milk, detection and duration of teat injuries, and milk odor. It was possible to determine the cause by microbiologic culture of specimens from 136 of the 147 cows of the study. Of 78 infections caused by gram-negative (mostly coliform) organisms, 62 (79%) were predicted accurately to be caused by gram-negative organisms. Of 57 infections caused by gram-positive organisms, 45 (79%) were predicted correctly to be caused by gram-positive organisms. Correctly predicted as gram-positive organisms causing infection were: Actinomyces pyogenes in 20 of 21 (95%) cows; Staphylococcus sp in 14 of 22 (64%) cows; Streptococcus sp in 10 of 13 (77%) cows and Bacillus sp in 1 cow. Overall accuracy, in those instances when bacteria were isolated (136 cows), was 78%.

Summary

The accuracy of a scheme for predicting the gram-staining reaction of organisms causing bovine mastitis in cows with systemic signs of disease (anorexia) was evaluated over 1 year. Criteria for making the predictions included: season of year, stage of lactation, appearance of milk, detection and duration of teat injuries, and milk odor. It was possible to determine the cause by microbiologic culture of specimens from 136 of the 147 cows of the study. Of 78 infections caused by gram-negative (mostly coliform) organisms, 62 (79%) were predicted accurately to be caused by gram-negative organisms. Of 57 infections caused by gram-positive organisms, 45 (79%) were predicted correctly to be caused by gram-positive organisms. Correctly predicted as gram-positive organisms causing infection were: Actinomyces pyogenes in 20 of 21 (95%) cows; Staphylococcus sp in 14 of 22 (64%) cows; Streptococcus sp in 10 of 13 (77%) cows and Bacillus sp in 1 cow. Overall accuracy, in those instances when bacteria were isolated (136 cows), was 78%.

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