Prevalence of toxoplasmosis in swine from Iowa

Jeff J. Zimmerman From the Departments of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine (Zimmerman, Beran) and Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Owen), College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, and the Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Dreesen).

Search for other papers by Jeff J. Zimmerman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
David W. Dreesen From the Departments of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine (Zimmerman, Beran) and Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Owen), College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, and the Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Dreesen).

Search for other papers by David W. Dreesen in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
William J. Owen From the Departments of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine (Zimmerman, Beran) and Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Owen), College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, and the Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Dreesen).

Search for other papers by William J. Owen in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MPVM
, and
George W. Beran From the Departments of Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine (Zimmerman, Beran) and Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Owen), College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, and the Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (Dreesen).

Search for other papers by George W. Beran in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Summary

Of swine from 104 herds, 2,616 were tested for antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii, using an elisa. Data were analyzed according to swine type, herd size, facility type, and season. The true prevalence of toxoplasmosis was estimated as 5.4% among finishing swine and 11.4% among sows and gilts. Herds with <100 breeding swine were significantly (P < 0.05) more likely to be infected than were herds with ≥100 breeding swine. The rate of seropositivity in breeding swine was approximately the same in infected herds, regardless of herd size. Herds with finishing swine maintained in total confinement were as likely to become infected as were herds maintained in other types of facilities, but infected herds with finishing swine maintained in confinement appeared to have a lower in-herd prevalence than did herds maintained in other types of facilities (P = 0.09). Seasonal effects were not observed, and prevalence remained relatively constant throughout the year.

Summary

Of swine from 104 herds, 2,616 were tested for antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii, using an elisa. Data were analyzed according to swine type, herd size, facility type, and season. The true prevalence of toxoplasmosis was estimated as 5.4% among finishing swine and 11.4% among sows and gilts. Herds with <100 breeding swine were significantly (P < 0.05) more likely to be infected than were herds with ≥100 breeding swine. The rate of seropositivity in breeding swine was approximately the same in infected herds, regardless of herd size. Herds with finishing swine maintained in total confinement were as likely to become infected as were herds maintained in other types of facilities, but infected herds with finishing swine maintained in confinement appeared to have a lower in-herd prevalence than did herds maintained in other types of facilities (P = 0.09). Seasonal effects were not observed, and prevalence remained relatively constant throughout the year.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 469 469 192
PDF Downloads 33 33 9
Advertisement