Veterinary and nonveterinary costs of disease in 29 California dairies participating in the National Animal Health Monitoring System from 1988 to 1989

Benjamin J. Weigler From the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (Weigler, Hird, Holmes, Sischo), Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA, 9580 Micron Ave, Suite E, Sacramento, CA 95827 (Danaye-Elmi, Utterback), and Animal Health Branch, California Department of Food and Agriculture, 1220 North St, Sacramento, CA 95814 (Palmer).

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David W. Hird From the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (Weigler, Hird, Holmes, Sischo), Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA, 9580 Micron Ave, Suite E, Sacramento, CA 95827 (Danaye-Elmi, Utterback), and Animal Health Branch, California Department of Food and Agriculture, 1220 North St, Sacramento, CA 95814 (Palmer).

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William M. Sischo From the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (Weigler, Hird, Holmes, Sischo), Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA, 9580 Micron Ave, Suite E, Sacramento, CA 95827 (Danaye-Elmi, Utterback), and Animal Health Branch, California Department of Food and Agriculture, 1220 North St, Sacramento, CA 95814 (Palmer).

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John C. Holmes From the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (Weigler, Hird, Holmes, Sischo), Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA, 9580 Micron Ave, Suite E, Sacramento, CA 95827 (Danaye-Elmi, Utterback), and Animal Health Branch, California Department of Food and Agriculture, 1220 North St, Sacramento, CA 95814 (Palmer).

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Cyrus Danaye-Elmi From the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (Weigler, Hird, Holmes, Sischo), Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA, 9580 Micron Ave, Suite E, Sacramento, CA 95827 (Danaye-Elmi, Utterback), and Animal Health Branch, California Department of Food and Agriculture, 1220 North St, Sacramento, CA 95814 (Palmer).

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Charles W. Palmer From the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (Weigler, Hird, Holmes, Sischo), Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA, 9580 Micron Ave, Suite E, Sacramento, CA 95827 (Danaye-Elmi, Utterback), and Animal Health Branch, California Department of Food and Agriculture, 1220 North St, Sacramento, CA 95814 (Palmer).

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William W. Utterback From the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (Weigler, Hird, Holmes, Sischo), Veterinary Services, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA, 9580 Micron Ave, Suite E, Sacramento, CA 95827 (Danaye-Elmi, Utterback), and Animal Health Branch, California Department of Food and Agriculture, 1220 North St, Sacramento, CA 95814 (Palmer).

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Summary

Twenty-nine California dairy herds were studied over a 12-month period from 1988 to 1989 as part of the National Animal Health Monitoring System. Monthly interviews administered to dairy producers were used to measure the costs of all health-related expenditures and disease incidence in these herds. Of the total $1,523,558 reported, $1,355,467 (89%) was attributed to cost of disease events and $168,091 (11%) to cost of disease prevention. Most (78%) of the cost of disease events was attributable to death and culling losses. Veterinary services accounted for only $54,099 (4%) of total costs, 64% of which was used for disease prevention, compared with 36% for disease treatment. Udder disease was the most costly category of diseases reported at an average of $49.85/head at risk annually, followed by reproductive problems at $38.05. Through the use of sampling strategies less biased than those used in other surveys, the National Animal Health Monitoring System is designed to provide statistically-valid estimates of disease incidence and costs across broad geographic areas, potentially benefiting all those interested in the economics of livestock diseases in the United States.

Summary

Twenty-nine California dairy herds were studied over a 12-month period from 1988 to 1989 as part of the National Animal Health Monitoring System. Monthly interviews administered to dairy producers were used to measure the costs of all health-related expenditures and disease incidence in these herds. Of the total $1,523,558 reported, $1,355,467 (89%) was attributed to cost of disease events and $168,091 (11%) to cost of disease prevention. Most (78%) of the cost of disease events was attributable to death and culling losses. Veterinary services accounted for only $54,099 (4%) of total costs, 64% of which was used for disease prevention, compared with 36% for disease treatment. Udder disease was the most costly category of diseases reported at an average of $49.85/head at risk annually, followed by reproductive problems at $38.05. Through the use of sampling strategies less biased than those used in other surveys, the National Animal Health Monitoring System is designed to provide statistically-valid estimates of disease incidence and costs across broad geographic areas, potentially benefiting all those interested in the economics of livestock diseases in the United States.

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