Assessment of survey radiography and comparison with x-ray computed tomography for detection of hyperfunctioning adrenocortical tumors in dogs

George Voorhout From the Department of Radiology (Voorhout) and the Small Animal Clinic (Stolp, Rijnberk), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, and the Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (van Waes), State University of Utrecht Yalelaan 10, 3584 CM Utrecht, The Netherlands.

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Ruurd Stolp From the Department of Radiology (Voorhout) and the Small Animal Clinic (Stolp, Rijnberk), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, and the Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (van Waes), State University of Utrecht Yalelaan 10, 3584 CM Utrecht, The Netherlands.

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Ad Rijnberk From the Department of Radiology (Voorhout) and the Small Animal Clinic (Stolp, Rijnberk), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, and the Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (van Waes), State University of Utrecht Yalelaan 10, 3584 CM Utrecht, The Netherlands.

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Paul F.G.M. van Waes From the Department of Radiology (Voorhout) and the Small Animal Clinic (Stolp, Rijnberk), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, and the Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine (van Waes), State University of Utrecht Yalelaan 10, 3584 CM Utrecht, The Netherlands.

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 MD, PhD

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Summary

Results of abdominal survey radiography and x-ray computed tomography (CT) were compared in 13 dogs with hyperadrenocorticism histologically attributed to adrenocortical tumors. X-ray computed tomography enabled accurate localization of the tumor in all 13 dogs. Apart from 2 poorly demarcated irregular-shaped and mineralized carcinomas, there were no differences between adenoma (n=3) and carcinoma (n= 10) on CT images. In 1 dog, invasion of the caudal vena cava by the tumor was suggested on CT images and was confirmed during surgery. Suspicion of adhesions between tumors of the right adrenal gland and the caudal vena cava on the basis of CT images was confirmed during surgery in only 2 of 6 dogs.

Survey radiography allowed accurate localization of the tumor in 7 dogs (4 on the right side and 3 on the left). In 6 of these dogs, the tumor was visible as a well-demarcated soft tissue mass and, in the other dog, as a poorly demarcated mineralized mass. The smallest tumor visualized on survey radiographs had a diameter of 20 mm on CT images. Six tumors with diameter ≤ 20 mm were not visualized on survey radiographs. In 1 of these dogs, a mineralized nodule was found in the left adrenal region, without evidence of a mass.

In a considerable number of cases, survey radiography can provide presurgical localization of adrenocortical tumors in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism; CT is redundant in these instances. In the absence of positive radiographic findings, CT is valuable for localization of adrenocortical tumors.

Summary

Results of abdominal survey radiography and x-ray computed tomography (CT) were compared in 13 dogs with hyperadrenocorticism histologically attributed to adrenocortical tumors. X-ray computed tomography enabled accurate localization of the tumor in all 13 dogs. Apart from 2 poorly demarcated irregular-shaped and mineralized carcinomas, there were no differences between adenoma (n=3) and carcinoma (n= 10) on CT images. In 1 dog, invasion of the caudal vena cava by the tumor was suggested on CT images and was confirmed during surgery. Suspicion of adhesions between tumors of the right adrenal gland and the caudal vena cava on the basis of CT images was confirmed during surgery in only 2 of 6 dogs.

Survey radiography allowed accurate localization of the tumor in 7 dogs (4 on the right side and 3 on the left). In 6 of these dogs, the tumor was visible as a well-demarcated soft tissue mass and, in the other dog, as a poorly demarcated mineralized mass. The smallest tumor visualized on survey radiographs had a diameter of 20 mm on CT images. Six tumors with diameter ≤ 20 mm were not visualized on survey radiographs. In 1 of these dogs, a mineralized nodule was found in the left adrenal region, without evidence of a mass.

In a considerable number of cases, survey radiography can provide presurgical localization of adrenocortical tumors in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism; CT is redundant in these instances. In the absence of positive radiographic findings, CT is valuable for localization of adrenocortical tumors.

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