Delayed growth in two German Shepherd Dog littermates with normal serum concentrations of growth hormone, thyroxine, and cortisol

John F. Randolph From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Randolph), Pathology (Miller), and Anatomy (Cummings), New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, and Department of Environmental Practice, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901 (Lothrop).

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Christine L. Miller From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Randolph), Pathology (Miller), and Anatomy (Cummings), New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, and Department of Environmental Practice, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901 (Lothrop).

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John F. Cummings From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Randolph), Pathology (Miller), and Anatomy (Cummings), New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, and Department of Environmental Practice, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901 (Lothrop).

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Clinton D. Lothrop Jr. From the Departments of Clinical Sciences (Randolph), Pathology (Miller), and Anatomy (Cummings), New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, and Department of Environmental Practice, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37901 (Lothrop).

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Summary

Four German Shepherd Dogs from a litter of 10 were evaluated because of postnatal onset of proportionate growth stunting that clinically resembled well-documented hypopituitary dwarfism in that breed. Although 2 pups had histologic evidence of hypopituitarism, the remaining 2 pups had normal serum growth hormone concentration and adrenocorticotropin secretory capability, and normal adrenal function test and thyroid function study results. Furthermore, the initially stunted German Shepherd Dogs grew at a steady rate until at 1 year, body weight and shoulder height approximated normal measurements. Seemingly, delayed growth in these pups may represent one end of a clinical spectrum associated with hypopituitarism in German Shepherd Dogs.

Summary

Four German Shepherd Dogs from a litter of 10 were evaluated because of postnatal onset of proportionate growth stunting that clinically resembled well-documented hypopituitary dwarfism in that breed. Although 2 pups had histologic evidence of hypopituitarism, the remaining 2 pups had normal serum growth hormone concentration and adrenocorticotropin secretory capability, and normal adrenal function test and thyroid function study results. Furthermore, the initially stunted German Shepherd Dogs grew at a steady rate until at 1 year, body weight and shoulder height approximated normal measurements. Seemingly, delayed growth in these pups may represent one end of a clinical spectrum associated with hypopituitarism in German Shepherd Dogs.

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