Relevant research to serve our community

Christopher K. Cebra College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

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 VMD, MS, DAVCIM
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Luiz E. Bermudez College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

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 MD
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Susan J. Tornquist College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

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 DVM, PhD, DACVP

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Oregon State University (OSU) is 1 of only 2 land-, sea-, space-, and sun-grant universities with such a designation in the United States. The Carlson College of Veterinary Medicine (CCVM) at OSU performs research serving several of those missions, with emphasis on topics that matter and address the needs of our community.

Faculty members engage in research that is directed toward improvement of health care and focused on 6 important areas of high societal importance, including antimicrobial resistance, cancer, infectious diseases, marine health, regenerative medicine, and the microbiome.

Dr. Luiz Bermudez spearheads the study of antimicrobial resistance, using the Oregon Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory to generate data on rising resistance patterns in the veterinary community. While of immediate interest to veterinary clinicians, these data also provide insights into the link between resistant isolates in animals and those from the humans they contact. This work is being conducted in collaboration with the local human healthcare system and Oregon Public Health and has direct applicability to the healthcare provided at the CCVM.

In cancer research, our clinicians participate in multi-institutional and locally based clinical trials, spearheaded by Drs. Katie Curran and Haley Leeper. Dr. Christopher Cebra heads an interdisciplinary team developing and testing novel single domain immunotherapeutic agents based on camelid heavy-chain antibodies. This team has developed a number of single domain antibodies, with particular emphasis on checkpoint inhibitors to be used to treat cancer in dogs. By using specific canine targets, this team seeks to develop products with greater clinical efficacy than those originally developed for use in other species. Dr. Steve Ramsey’s work is in systems biology of cancer, with a special interest in osteosarcoma.

Our infectious disease research efforts are in several areas. Drs. Mahfuzur Sarker and Claudia Häse investigate issues of food safety. Drs. Hong Moulton and Dan Rockey both investigate modes of disease prevention. Dr. Luiz Bermudez studies the pathogenic mechanisms and treatment of mycobacterial diseases. Drs. Anna Jolles’ and Brianna Beechler’s interest is the ecology of infectious diseases, and Dr. Beechler leads our One Health program. Dr. Lia Danelishvili is an expert in bacteriophages and is advancing the program for their use in Johne’s disease. Dr. Brian Dolan studies comparative susceptibility to infectious disease, including the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

As part of our university-wide Marine Sciences Initiative, CCVM researchers contribute their expertise to interdisciplinary efforts to improve stewardship of the ocean. Drs. Claudia Häse and Carla Schubiger are working on new methods to detect pathogenic infections of commercial aquatic species and the use of probiotics in their treatment. Dr. Michael Kent investigates the role parasites play in salmonid survival, while Dr. Ling Jin studies herpes simplex virus infection of fish.

Regenerative medicine is a rapidly developing field, using the principle of renewing or revitalizing damaged or dysfunctional tissues rather than removing them, replacing them, or considering them a permanent loss. Dr. Jennifer Warnock’s work revolves around rebuilding damaged joints through the propagation of explanted cells. Drs. Jennifer Johns and Lacy Kamm investigate the role of stem cells in modulating infectious and inflammatory diseases, with the goal of developing novel clinical interventions.

The increasing recognition of the importance that microbes play in modulating health and disease has fueled interest in microbiomes. Researchers at the CCVM are actively involved with collaborators in developing interventions to manipulate the microbiome to benefit health in patients. Dr. Natalia Shulzhenko investigates the role microbiota play in preventing or contributing to diabetes mellitus. Dr. Stacie Summers seeks to define the gut microbiome in cats during health and disease.

CCVM faculty engage in medical research that is relevant and serves our community to make it healthier.

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