Isolation, characterization, and expression of stromelysin-1 in primary tumors of dogs

Kara C. Sorensen Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
Present address is US Navy Marine Mammal Program, Biosciences Division Code 2351, 53560 Hull St, San Diego, CA 92152-5001.

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Rebecca G. Newman Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
Present address is Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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 DVM, MS
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Barbara E. Kitchell Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
Present address is Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

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David J. Schaeffer Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

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Arthur M. Siegel Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

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Abstract

Objective—To isolate and characterize the cDNA sequence of canine stromelysin-1 (matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-3), screen various naturally developing primary tumors of dogs, and assess the effect of stromelysin-1 on survival of dogs with cancer.

Sample Population—3 canine cell lines and biopsy specimens of primary tumors collected from 54 dogs.

Procedure—3 canine cell lines and biopsy specimens of primary tumors collected from 54 dogs at the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital were used in the study. Primer sets based on human stromelysin-1 and consensus sequences were designed for expression, screening, and isolation. Two additional primer sets were designed for screening. Samples were assayed at least in duplicate. Data were analyzed for differences in expression of stromelysin-1 on the basis of sex, age, metastasis, malignant versus nonmalignant tissue origin, and duration of patient survival.

Results—A 1,479-bp cDNA nucleotide sequence was amplified from established canine cell lines. The open reading frame encoded a protein consisting of 478 amino acids. This sequence was 70% to 88% homologous with stromelysin-1 of other species at the amino acid level. Fifty-four samples were screened for stromelysin-1. Of these, 34 (63%) had positive results and 20 (37%) had negative results for expression. Stromelysin-1 and metastasis were associated with a poor prognosis for survival.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Stromelysin-1 is a potential activator of other members of the MMP family. Additional studies are needed to investigate the relationship between stromelysin-1 production and aggressive biological behavior of tumors in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1526–1535)

Abstract

Objective—To isolate and characterize the cDNA sequence of canine stromelysin-1 (matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-3), screen various naturally developing primary tumors of dogs, and assess the effect of stromelysin-1 on survival of dogs with cancer.

Sample Population—3 canine cell lines and biopsy specimens of primary tumors collected from 54 dogs.

Procedure—3 canine cell lines and biopsy specimens of primary tumors collected from 54 dogs at the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital were used in the study. Primer sets based on human stromelysin-1 and consensus sequences were designed for expression, screening, and isolation. Two additional primer sets were designed for screening. Samples were assayed at least in duplicate. Data were analyzed for differences in expression of stromelysin-1 on the basis of sex, age, metastasis, malignant versus nonmalignant tissue origin, and duration of patient survival.

Results—A 1,479-bp cDNA nucleotide sequence was amplified from established canine cell lines. The open reading frame encoded a protein consisting of 478 amino acids. This sequence was 70% to 88% homologous with stromelysin-1 of other species at the amino acid level. Fifty-four samples were screened for stromelysin-1. Of these, 34 (63%) had positive results and 20 (37%) had negative results for expression. Stromelysin-1 and metastasis were associated with a poor prognosis for survival.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Stromelysin-1 is a potential activator of other members of the MMP family. Additional studies are needed to investigate the relationship between stromelysin-1 production and aggressive biological behavior of tumors in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1526–1535)

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