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Climatic and aeroallergen risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in horses

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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2027.
  • | 2 Present address is Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4458.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2027.

Abstract

Objective—To estimate the association between climate and airborne pollen and fungal factors and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in horses.

Sample Population—Data from 1,444 horses with a diagnosis of COPD.

Procedure—The Veterinary Medical Database was used to identify records of horses admitted to veterinary teaching hospitals in the United States and Canada between 1990 and 1999. Rainfall, mean minimum and maximum temperature, and maximum monthly pollen and fungal spore (mold) counts recorded at the city closest to where the hospital is located were identified for each month data were reported to the Veterinary Medical Database. Associations between climatic and aeroallergen data and monthly prevalence of COPD were estimated by use of crosscorrelation and logistic regression models.

Results—Significant positive correlations were found between prevalence of COPD and rainfall 3 months previously, minimum temperature 1 and 2 months previously, total pollen counts measured 3 months previously, and total mold counts measured during the same month and 1 month previously.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Outdoor aeroallergens and climatic factors may contribute to the occurrence of COPD in horses. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:818–824)

Abstract

Objective—To estimate the association between climate and airborne pollen and fungal factors and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in horses.

Sample Population—Data from 1,444 horses with a diagnosis of COPD.

Procedure—The Veterinary Medical Database was used to identify records of horses admitted to veterinary teaching hospitals in the United States and Canada between 1990 and 1999. Rainfall, mean minimum and maximum temperature, and maximum monthly pollen and fungal spore (mold) counts recorded at the city closest to where the hospital is located were identified for each month data were reported to the Veterinary Medical Database. Associations between climatic and aeroallergen data and monthly prevalence of COPD were estimated by use of crosscorrelation and logistic regression models.

Results—Significant positive correlations were found between prevalence of COPD and rainfall 3 months previously, minimum temperature 1 and 2 months previously, total pollen counts measured 3 months previously, and total mold counts measured during the same month and 1 month previously.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Outdoor aeroallergens and climatic factors may contribute to the occurrence of COPD in horses. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:818–824)