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Immunohistochemical analysis of the distribution of desmoglein 1 and 2 in the skin of dogs and cats

Vincenzo MiragliottaDepartment of Veterinary Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pisa, I-56124 Pisa, Italy.

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Alessandra ColiDepartment of Veterinary Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pisa, I-56124 Pisa, Italy.

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Maria P. RicciardiDepartment of Veterinary Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pisa, I-56124 Pisa, Italy.

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Adriano PodestàDepartment of Veterinary Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pisa, I-56124 Pisa, Italy.

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Francesca AbramoDepartment of Animal Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pisa, I-56124 Pisa, Italy.

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Abstract

Objective—To compare the distribution of desmoglein (Dsg) 1 and 2 in skin specimens obtained from dogs and cats to provide information about the possible role of the density of Dsg 1 and 2 in the localization of lesions attributable to pemphigus foliaceus in these 2 species.

Sample Population—Skin biopsy specimens obtained from 4 dogs and 4 cats.

Procedure—Biopsy specimens were collected from the muzzle, bridge of the nose, ear, dorsum, abdomen, area adjacent to the teats, and footpads of each animal. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded skin samples by use of a biotinylated mouse monoclonal anti-Dsg 1 and 2 antibody raised against bovine muzzle. Color development was performed by use of the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase method with a chromogenic substrate.

Results—Immunohistochemical staining yielded a positive reaction in skin samples obtained from all anatomic sites. The intensity and distribution of staining were related to the number of layers of the stratum spinosum. No differences were detected between samples obtained from dogs and cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—No differences in intensity of Dsg 1 and 2 antigen were observed in the stratum spinosum between skin samples obtained from dogs and cats. Analysis of this result suggests that factors other than the distribution of Dsg may be responsible for the differences in localization of primary clinical lesions in dogs and cats with pemphigus foliaceus. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1931–1935)

Abstract

Objective—To compare the distribution of desmoglein (Dsg) 1 and 2 in skin specimens obtained from dogs and cats to provide information about the possible role of the density of Dsg 1 and 2 in the localization of lesions attributable to pemphigus foliaceus in these 2 species.

Sample Population—Skin biopsy specimens obtained from 4 dogs and 4 cats.

Procedure—Biopsy specimens were collected from the muzzle, bridge of the nose, ear, dorsum, abdomen, area adjacent to the teats, and footpads of each animal. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded skin samples by use of a biotinylated mouse monoclonal anti-Dsg 1 and 2 antibody raised against bovine muzzle. Color development was performed by use of the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase method with a chromogenic substrate.

Results—Immunohistochemical staining yielded a positive reaction in skin samples obtained from all anatomic sites. The intensity and distribution of staining were related to the number of layers of the stratum spinosum. No differences were detected between samples obtained from dogs and cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—No differences in intensity of Dsg 1 and 2 antigen were observed in the stratum spinosum between skin samples obtained from dogs and cats. Analysis of this result suggests that factors other than the distribution of Dsg may be responsible for the differences in localization of primary clinical lesions in dogs and cats with pemphigus foliaceus. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1931–1935)