Advertisement

Use of vitamin B12 in joint lavage for determination of dilution factors of canine synovial fluid

Tanya de BruinDepartment of Diagnostic Imaging of Domestic Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium.

Search for other papers by Tanya de Bruin in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Hilde de RoosterDepartment of Small Animal Medicine and Clinical Biology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium.

Search for other papers by Hilde de Rooster in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Henri van BreeDepartment of Diagnostic Imaging of Domestic Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium.

Search for other papers by Henri van Bree in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
, and
Eric CoxDepartments of Virology, Parasitology, and Immunology, Laboratory of Veterinary Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium.

Search for other papers by Eric Cox in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Abstract

Objective—To test a modified saline (0.9% NaCl) solution joint washing (lavage) technique that includes the use of vitamin B12 as an internal marker for the evaluation of synovial fluid dilution in lavage samples from canine joints.

Sample Population—9 plasma samples obtained from blood samples of 9 healthy dogs and 9 synovial fluid samples aspirated from stifle joints of 9 cadaveric dogs.

Procedure—Photometric absorbances of 25% vitamin B12 solution, canine synovial fluid, and canine plasma were measured in a spectrophotometer to establish an optimal wavelength for analysis. Canine synovial fluid and plasma samples were mixed with the 25% vitamin B12 solution to obtain 1%, 3%, 5%, 10%, 20%, and 50% solutions of synovial fluid or plasma. Diluted synovial fluid and plasma samples were used to simulate joint lavage samples and to examine the possible interference of these substances (synovial fluid or plasma) with the absorbance of the 25% vitamin B12 solution in photometric analysis.

Results—The optimal wavelength was found to be at 550 nm. Canine synovial fluid and plasma samples did not interfere with the absorbance measurements of the 25% vitamin B12 solution up to a 50% dilution of plasma or synovial fluid.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The modified saline solution joint lavage method with the use of a 25% vitamin B12 solution as an internal standard provides an accurate and reliable technique for the evaluation of synovial fluid dilution in lavage samples from canine joints. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1903–1906)

Abstract

Objective—To test a modified saline (0.9% NaCl) solution joint washing (lavage) technique that includes the use of vitamin B12 as an internal marker for the evaluation of synovial fluid dilution in lavage samples from canine joints.

Sample Population—9 plasma samples obtained from blood samples of 9 healthy dogs and 9 synovial fluid samples aspirated from stifle joints of 9 cadaveric dogs.

Procedure—Photometric absorbances of 25% vitamin B12 solution, canine synovial fluid, and canine plasma were measured in a spectrophotometer to establish an optimal wavelength for analysis. Canine synovial fluid and plasma samples were mixed with the 25% vitamin B12 solution to obtain 1%, 3%, 5%, 10%, 20%, and 50% solutions of synovial fluid or plasma. Diluted synovial fluid and plasma samples were used to simulate joint lavage samples and to examine the possible interference of these substances (synovial fluid or plasma) with the absorbance of the 25% vitamin B12 solution in photometric analysis.

Results—The optimal wavelength was found to be at 550 nm. Canine synovial fluid and plasma samples did not interfere with the absorbance measurements of the 25% vitamin B12 solution up to a 50% dilution of plasma or synovial fluid.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The modified saline solution joint lavage method with the use of a 25% vitamin B12 solution as an internal standard provides an accurate and reliable technique for the evaluation of synovial fluid dilution in lavage samples from canine joints. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1903–1906)