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Comparison of hematologic values and transforming growth factor-β and insulin-like growth factor concentrations in platelet concentrates obtained by use of buffy coat and apheresis methods from equine blood

W. Wesley SutterDepartment of Clinical Sciences, Comparative Orthopedic Molecular Medicine Research Laboratories, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Andris J. KanepsDepartment of Clinical Sciences, Comparative Orthopedic Molecular Medicine Research Laboratories, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
Present address is Parrott Equine Associates, PO Box 298, Hamilton, MA 01936.

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Alicia L. BertoneDepartment of Clinical Sciences, Comparative Orthopedic Molecular Medicine Research Laboratories, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the buffy coat and apheresis methods for preparation of platelet concentrates from equine blood by comparing platelet and growth factor concentrations.

Animals—15 mature mixed-breed geldings.

Procedure—Whole blood samples were collected and processed by use of a buffy coat or apheresis method to obtain platelet poor and platelet concentrated fractions. The PCV, WBC count, and platelet count were compared among whole blood samples, platelet poor fractions, concentrates obtained by use of the apheresis method (ie, apheresis platelet concentrates), and concentrates obtained by use of the buffy coat method (ie, buffy coat platelet concentrates). Concentrations of transforming growth factor- β (ie, TGF-β1 and TGF-β2) and insulin-like growth factor were compared between buffy coat and apheresis platelet concentrates.

Results—Platelet concentrations were 8.9-fold and 5.2-fold greater in buffy coat and apheresis platelet concentrates, respectively, compared with whole blood. Platelet concentrations were 13.1-fold greater in filtered apheresis platelet concentrates, compared with whole blood. TGF-β1 concentrations were 2.8- fold and 3.1-fold greater in buffy coat and apheresis platelet concentrates, respectively, and TGF-β1 concentrations were 10.5-fold greater in filtered apheresis platelet concentrates, compared with whole blood. TGF-β2 concentrations were 3.6-fold greater in apheresis platelet concentrates, compared with whole blood. Platelet concentrations correlated with growth factor concentrations across all blood and platelet fractions. White blood cell counts had a significant positive correlation with TGF-β1 concentration in buffy coat platelet concentrates.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Platelets and TGF-β1 can be concentrated reliably from equine blood by use of buffy coat or apheresis methods, without modification of the protocols used for humans. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:924–930)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the buffy coat and apheresis methods for preparation of platelet concentrates from equine blood by comparing platelet and growth factor concentrations.

Animals—15 mature mixed-breed geldings.

Procedure—Whole blood samples were collected and processed by use of a buffy coat or apheresis method to obtain platelet poor and platelet concentrated fractions. The PCV, WBC count, and platelet count were compared among whole blood samples, platelet poor fractions, concentrates obtained by use of the apheresis method (ie, apheresis platelet concentrates), and concentrates obtained by use of the buffy coat method (ie, buffy coat platelet concentrates). Concentrations of transforming growth factor- β (ie, TGF-β1 and TGF-β2) and insulin-like growth factor were compared between buffy coat and apheresis platelet concentrates.

Results—Platelet concentrations were 8.9-fold and 5.2-fold greater in buffy coat and apheresis platelet concentrates, respectively, compared with whole blood. Platelet concentrations were 13.1-fold greater in filtered apheresis platelet concentrates, compared with whole blood. TGF-β1 concentrations were 2.8- fold and 3.1-fold greater in buffy coat and apheresis platelet concentrates, respectively, and TGF-β1 concentrations were 10.5-fold greater in filtered apheresis platelet concentrates, compared with whole blood. TGF-β2 concentrations were 3.6-fold greater in apheresis platelet concentrates, compared with whole blood. Platelet concentrations correlated with growth factor concentrations across all blood and platelet fractions. White blood cell counts had a significant positive correlation with TGF-β1 concentration in buffy coat platelet concentrates.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Platelets and TGF-β1 can be concentrated reliably from equine blood by use of buffy coat or apheresis methods, without modification of the protocols used for humans. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:924–930)