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Evaluation of a technique of inducing hypertensive renal insufficiency in cats

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  • 1 Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 2 Present address is Pfizer Animal Health, W Michigan Ave, Kalamazoo, MI 49001.
  • | 3 Department of Athens Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 4 Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 5 Department of Athens Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 6 Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 7 Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 8 Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 9 Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Abstract

Objective—To compare 2 techniques of inducing combined renal insufficiency and systemic hypertension in cats.

Animals—22 cats 6 to 12 months of age.

Procedure—Cats were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups. Control (C) group cats had 2 intact kidneys, remnant kidney (RK) group cats underwent unilateral partial renal infarction and contralateral nephrectomy, and remnant-wrap (W) group cats underwent unilateral partial renal infarction and partial abtation and wrapping of the contralateral kidney. Systemic arterial blood pressure (BP) was measured continuously by use of implanted radiotelemetric devices. Renal function was assessed via determination of glomerular filtration rate, measurement of serum creatinine and BUN concentrations, and determination of urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (UP/C). Serum aldosterone concentration and plasma renin activity were measured on day 75.

Results—Systolic BP was significantly higher in groups RK and W than in group C, and systolic BP was significantly higher in group W than in group RK. Serum aldosterone concentration and plasma renin activity were significantly higher in group W, compared with groups C and RK. Glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower in groups RK and W, compared with group C. Histologic indices of renal injury and UP/C were significantly higher in group W, compared with groups C and RK.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Hypertensive renal insufficiency in group W was characterized by marked sustained systemic hypertension, decreased renal function, proteinuria, activation of the reninangiotensin-aldosterone axis, and renal structural injury. Results support the hypothesis that marked systemic hypertension, activation of the reninangiotensin- aldosterone axis, and proteinuria may damage the kidney of cats with preexisting renal insufficiency. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1006–1013)

Abstract

Objective—To compare 2 techniques of inducing combined renal insufficiency and systemic hypertension in cats.

Animals—22 cats 6 to 12 months of age.

Procedure—Cats were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups. Control (C) group cats had 2 intact kidneys, remnant kidney (RK) group cats underwent unilateral partial renal infarction and contralateral nephrectomy, and remnant-wrap (W) group cats underwent unilateral partial renal infarction and partial abtation and wrapping of the contralateral kidney. Systemic arterial blood pressure (BP) was measured continuously by use of implanted radiotelemetric devices. Renal function was assessed via determination of glomerular filtration rate, measurement of serum creatinine and BUN concentrations, and determination of urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (UP/C). Serum aldosterone concentration and plasma renin activity were measured on day 75.

Results—Systolic BP was significantly higher in groups RK and W than in group C, and systolic BP was significantly higher in group W than in group RK. Serum aldosterone concentration and plasma renin activity were significantly higher in group W, compared with groups C and RK. Glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower in groups RK and W, compared with group C. Histologic indices of renal injury and UP/C were significantly higher in group W, compared with groups C and RK.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Hypertensive renal insufficiency in group W was characterized by marked sustained systemic hypertension, decreased renal function, proteinuria, activation of the reninangiotensin-aldosterone axis, and renal structural injury. Results support the hypothesis that marked systemic hypertension, activation of the reninangiotensin- aldosterone axis, and proteinuria may damage the kidney of cats with preexisting renal insufficiency. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1006–1013)