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Evaluation of serum values of pancreatic enzymes after endoscopic retrograde pancreatography in dogs

Thomas Spillmann Dip med vet, Dr med vet1, Irmeli Happonen DVM, PhD2, Satu Sankari DVM, PhD3, Andrea Wittker Dip ing4, Tuomo Kähkönen5, and Elias Westermarck DVM, PhD6
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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Internal Medicine at the Medical and Forensic Veterinary Clinic I, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Frankfurter Strasse 126, 35392 Giessen, Germany.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Hämeentie 57, 00014 Helsinki University, Finland.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Hämeentie 57, 00014 Helsinki University, Finland.
  • | 4 ScheBo Biotech AG, Netanya Strasse 3, 35394 Giessen, Germany.
  • | 5 Department of Clinical Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Hämeentie 57, 00014 Helsinki University, Finland.
  • | 6 Department of Clinical Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Hämeentie 57, 00014 Helsinki University, Finland.

Abstract

Objective—To assess the safety of endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) in dogs by performing repeated clinical examinations and laboratory analyses of serum amylase, lipase, canine trypsin-like immunoreactivity (cTLI), and canine pancreatic elastase 1 (cE1) after the procedure.

Animals—7 healthy Beagles.

Procedure—Clinical examinations were performed and blood samples obtained for serum enzyme determinations before and at intervals (10 minutes; 2, 4, and 6 hours; and 1, 2, and 3 days) after ERP.

Results—Repeated clinical examinations revealed no signs of ERP-induced complications in the 7 dogs. Results of repeated laboratory tests indicated a transient increase in serum values of amylase, lipase, and cTLI but not cE1. Mean ± SD lipase activity increased from 120.7 ± 116.4 U/L to 423.4 ± 243.1 U/L at 4 hours after ERP. Median serum cTLI concentration increased from 16.2 µg/L (range, 7.7 to 26.5 µg/L) to 34.9 µg/L (range, 16.6 to 68.3 µg/L) 10 minutes after ERP. Enzyme values returned to baseline levels at the latest on day 2 in 6 of 7 dogs. Highest values for serum amylase, lipase, and cTLI and their delayed return to baseline values were detected in 1 dog with contrast filling of the pancreatic parenchyma.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that ERP appears to be a safe imaging technique of pancreatic ducts in healthy dogs, although it induced a transient increase in serum values of pancreatic enzymes. In dogs, repeated clinical examinations and serum enzyme determinations can be used to monitor ERP-induced complications such as acute pancreatitis. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:616–619)

Abstract

Objective—To assess the safety of endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) in dogs by performing repeated clinical examinations and laboratory analyses of serum amylase, lipase, canine trypsin-like immunoreactivity (cTLI), and canine pancreatic elastase 1 (cE1) after the procedure.

Animals—7 healthy Beagles.

Procedure—Clinical examinations were performed and blood samples obtained for serum enzyme determinations before and at intervals (10 minutes; 2, 4, and 6 hours; and 1, 2, and 3 days) after ERP.

Results—Repeated clinical examinations revealed no signs of ERP-induced complications in the 7 dogs. Results of repeated laboratory tests indicated a transient increase in serum values of amylase, lipase, and cTLI but not cE1. Mean ± SD lipase activity increased from 120.7 ± 116.4 U/L to 423.4 ± 243.1 U/L at 4 hours after ERP. Median serum cTLI concentration increased from 16.2 µg/L (range, 7.7 to 26.5 µg/L) to 34.9 µg/L (range, 16.6 to 68.3 µg/L) 10 minutes after ERP. Enzyme values returned to baseline levels at the latest on day 2 in 6 of 7 dogs. Highest values for serum amylase, lipase, and cTLI and their delayed return to baseline values were detected in 1 dog with contrast filling of the pancreatic parenchyma.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that ERP appears to be a safe imaging technique of pancreatic ducts in healthy dogs, although it induced a transient increase in serum values of pancreatic enzymes. In dogs, repeated clinical examinations and serum enzyme determinations can be used to monitor ERP-induced complications such as acute pancreatitis. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:616–619)