Advertisement

Evaluation of antiplatelet effects of ticlopidine in cats

Daniel F. HoganDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

Search for other papers by Daniel F. Hogan in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Dina A. AndrewsDepartment of Veterinary Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

Search for other papers by Dina A. Andrews in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Kristen K. TalbottDepartment of Veterinary Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

Search for other papers by Kristen K. Talbott in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BS
,
Henry W. GreenDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

Search for other papers by Henry W. Green in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Michael P. WardDepartment of Veterinary Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

Search for other papers by Michael P. Ward in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BVSc, MPVM, PhD
, and
Betsy M. CallowayDepartment of Veterinary Teaching Hospital, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

Search for other papers by Betsy M. Calloway in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BS

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether ticlopidine exerts an antiplatelet effect, estimate the pharmacodynamics of ticlopidine, and evaluate any acute adverse effects associated with administration of ticlopidine in cats.

Animals—8 domestic purpose-bred sexually intact male cats.

Procedure—Ticlopidine was administered orally (50 mg, q 24 h; 100 mg, q 24 h; 200 mg, q 24 h; and 250 mg, q 12 h). Each treatment period consisted of 10 days of drug administration. Platelet aggregation studies with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen and evaluation of oral mucosal bleeding times (OMBTs) were performed on days 3, 7, and 10 during each drug administration. Serotonin was measured to evaluate secretion at baseline and on day 10 for cats that received the 250-mg dosage.

Results—A significant reduction in platelet aggregation was detected in response to ADP on days 7 and 10 at 100 mg, on day 3 at 200 mg, and on days 3, 7, and 10 at 250 mg. A significant increase in the OMBT and decrease in serotonin release on day 10 at 250 mg was also detected; however, the cats had anorexia and vomiting at the 250-mg dosage.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Although there was a consistent antiplatelet effect at the 250-mg dosage, there was dose-dependent anorexia and vomiting that we conclude precludes the clinical usefulness of this drug in cats. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:327–332)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether ticlopidine exerts an antiplatelet effect, estimate the pharmacodynamics of ticlopidine, and evaluate any acute adverse effects associated with administration of ticlopidine in cats.

Animals—8 domestic purpose-bred sexually intact male cats.

Procedure—Ticlopidine was administered orally (50 mg, q 24 h; 100 mg, q 24 h; 200 mg, q 24 h; and 250 mg, q 12 h). Each treatment period consisted of 10 days of drug administration. Platelet aggregation studies with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen and evaluation of oral mucosal bleeding times (OMBTs) were performed on days 3, 7, and 10 during each drug administration. Serotonin was measured to evaluate secretion at baseline and on day 10 for cats that received the 250-mg dosage.

Results—A significant reduction in platelet aggregation was detected in response to ADP on days 7 and 10 at 100 mg, on day 3 at 200 mg, and on days 3, 7, and 10 at 250 mg. A significant increase in the OMBT and decrease in serotonin release on day 10 at 250 mg was also detected; however, the cats had anorexia and vomiting at the 250-mg dosage.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Although there was a consistent antiplatelet effect at the 250-mg dosage, there was dose-dependent anorexia and vomiting that we conclude precludes the clinical usefulness of this drug in cats. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:327–332)