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Urodynamic effects of a percutaneously controlled static hydraulic urethral sphincter in canine cadavers

Christopher A. AdinDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610- 0126.

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James P. FareseDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610- 0126.

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Alan R. CrossDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610- 0126.

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Mary K. ProvitolaDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610- 0126.

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Jeffrey S. DavidsonDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610- 0126.

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Hope JankunasDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610- 0126.

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Abstract

Objective—To describe a percutaneously controlled static hydraulic urethral sphincter (SHUS) and evaluate urodynamic effects of the SHUS in canine cadavers.

Sample Population—Cadavers of 6 adult female dogs.

Procedure—Cadavers were obtained immediately after dogs were euthanatized. Baseline maximal urethral closure pressure (MUCP) and cystourethral leak point pressure (CLPP) were measured by use of a urethral pressure profilometer. An SHUS system was constructed by use of a silicone vascular occluder and subcutaneous infusion port. The SHUS system was then placed around the pelvic urethra in each cadaver. Measurements of MUCP and CLPP were repeated after varying occlusion of the SHUS (0%, 25%, and 50% occlusion). Baseline MUCP and CLPP values were compared with values obtained at 0%, 25%, and 50% occlusion of the SHUS by use of repeatedmeasures ANOVA.

Results—Mean ± SD MUCP for canine cadavers was 7 ± 1.3 cm H2O at baseline, which increased to 127 ± 53 cm H2O after 50% occlusion of the SHUS. Mean CLPP was 11 ± 8.6 cm H2O at baseline, which increased to 73 ± 38 cm H2O after 50% occlusion of the SHUS. Mean MUCP and CLPP were significantly associated with the amount of occlusion.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The SHUS had positive effects on MUCP and CLPP in canine cadavers. Therefore, additional evaluation of the SHUS in live dogs is warranted. ( Am J Vet Res 2004; 65:283–288)

Abstract

Objective—To describe a percutaneously controlled static hydraulic urethral sphincter (SHUS) and evaluate urodynamic effects of the SHUS in canine cadavers.

Sample Population—Cadavers of 6 adult female dogs.

Procedure—Cadavers were obtained immediately after dogs were euthanatized. Baseline maximal urethral closure pressure (MUCP) and cystourethral leak point pressure (CLPP) were measured by use of a urethral pressure profilometer. An SHUS system was constructed by use of a silicone vascular occluder and subcutaneous infusion port. The SHUS system was then placed around the pelvic urethra in each cadaver. Measurements of MUCP and CLPP were repeated after varying occlusion of the SHUS (0%, 25%, and 50% occlusion). Baseline MUCP and CLPP values were compared with values obtained at 0%, 25%, and 50% occlusion of the SHUS by use of repeatedmeasures ANOVA.

Results—Mean ± SD MUCP for canine cadavers was 7 ± 1.3 cm H2O at baseline, which increased to 127 ± 53 cm H2O after 50% occlusion of the SHUS. Mean CLPP was 11 ± 8.6 cm H2O at baseline, which increased to 73 ± 38 cm H2O after 50% occlusion of the SHUS. Mean MUCP and CLPP were significantly associated with the amount of occlusion.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The SHUS had positive effects on MUCP and CLPP in canine cadavers. Therefore, additional evaluation of the SHUS in live dogs is warranted. ( Am J Vet Res 2004; 65:283–288)